Shield vs Care - What's the difference?

shield | care | Related terms |

Shield is a related term of care.


As nouns the difference between shield and care

is that shield is anything that protects or defends; defense; shelter; protection while care is tear, rift, crack.

As a verb shield

is to protect, to defend.

shield

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) shelde, from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • Anything that protects or defends; defense; shelter; protection.
  • # A broad piece of defensive armor, carried on the arm, formerly in general use in war, for the protection of the body.
  • #*
  • #*
  • #*
  • #*
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=8 , passage=My client welcomed the judge […] and they disappeared together into the Ethiopian card-room, which was filled with the assegais and exclamation point shields Mr. Cooke had had made at the sawmill at Beaverton.}}
  • # Figuratively, one who protects or defends.
  • #*
  • # (lichenology) In lichens, a hardened cup or disk surrounded by a rim and containing the fructification, or asci.
  • # (mining) A framework used to protect workmen in making an adit under ground, and capable of being pushed along as excavation progresses.
  • # (science fiction) A field of energy that protects or defends.
  • Something shaped like a shield, usually an inverted triangle with slightly curved lower sides.
  • # (heraldry) The escutcheon or field on which are placed the bearings in coats of arms.
  • # A spot resembling, or having the form of a shield.
  • #*
  • # (obsolete) A coin, the old French crown, or , having on one side the figure of a shield.
  • # (label) A sign or symbol, usually containing numbers and sometimes letters, identifying a highway route.
  • # (colloquial, law enforcement) A police badge.
  • #*
  • (geology) A large expanse of exposed stable Precambrian rock.
  • # (geology) A wide and relatively low-profiled volcano, usually composed entirely of lava flows.
  • Hyponyms
    * * * * (hyp-mid3) * * * * (hyp-mid3) * * (hyp-bottom)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) scieldan.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To protect, to defend.
  • *
  • (electricity) to protect from the influence of
  • Anagrams

    *

    care

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) (m), . See (m).

    Noun

  • (obsolete) Grief, sorrow.
  • *, Bk.V:
  • *:Than Feraunte his cosyn had grete care and cryed full lowde.
  • Close attention; concern; responsibility.
  • :
  • *Shakespeare
  • *:I thank thee for thy care and honest pains.
  • Worry.
  • :
  • Maintenance, upkeep.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Beside those things that are without, that which cometh upon me daily, the care of all the churches.
  • The treatment of those in need (especially as a profession).
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-21, author= Karen McVeigh
  • , volume=189, issue=2, page=10, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= US rules human genes can't be patented , passage=The US supreme court has ruled unanimously that natural human genes cannot be patented, a decision that scientists and civil rights campaigners said removed a major barrier to patient care and medical innovation.}}
  • The state of being cared for by others.
  • :
  • The object of watchful attention or anxiety.
  • *Spenser
  • *:Right sorrowfully mourning her bereaved cares .
  • Derived terms
    * caregiving * Care Sunday * managed care * primary care * secondary care * take care of * tertiary care
    Quotations
    * 1925 , Walter Anthony and Tom Reed (titles), Rupert Julian (director), The Phantom of the Opera , silent movie *: ‘Have a care , Buquet—ghosts like not to be seen or talked about!’

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (car)
  • (label) To be concerned about, have an interest in.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1959, author=(Georgette Heyer), title=(The Unknown Ajax), chapter=1
  • , passage=And no use for anyone to tell Charles that this was because the Family was in mourning for Mr Granville Darracott […]: Charles might only have been second footman at Darracott Place for a couple of months when that disaster occurred, but no one could gammon him into thinking that my lord cared a spangle for his heir.}}
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012, date=May 27, author=Nathan Rabin, work=The Onion AV Club
  • , title= TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “New Kid On The Block” (season 4, episode 8; originally aired 11/12/1992) , passage=This newfound infatuation renders Bart uncharacteristically vulnerable. He suddenly has something to care about beyond causing trouble and makes a dramatic transformation from hell-raiser to gentleman about town.}}
  • (label) To look after.
  • (label) To be mindful of.
  • Polite or formal way to say want.
  • Usage notes
    * Sense 4. Most commonly found as an interrogative or negative sentence. * Sense 4. This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive . See
    Derived terms
    * becare * care for

    Statistics

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