Shelter vs Camp - What's the difference?

shelter | camp |


As a noun shelter

is a refuge, haven or other cover or protection from something.

As a verb shelter

is to provide cover from damage or harassment; to shield; to protect.

As an initialism camp is

.

shelter

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A refuge, haven or other cover or protection from something.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1928, author=Lawrence R. Bourne
  • , title=Well Tackled! , chapter=7 citation , passage=The detective kept them in view. He made his way casually along the inside of the shelter until he reached an open scuttle close to where the two men were standing talking. Eavesdropping was not a thing Larard would have practised from choice, but there were times when, in the public interest, he had to do it, and this was one of them.}}
  • An institution that provides temporary housing for homeless people, battered women etc.
  • Derived terms

    * bus shelter

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To provide cover from damage or harassment; to shield; to protect.
  • * Dryden
  • Those ruins sheltered once his sacred head.
  • * Southey
  • You have no convents in which such persons may be received and sheltered .
  • To take cover.
  • During the rainstorm, we sheltered under a tree.

    camp

    English

    (wikipedia camp)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) . The verb is from (etyl) (m), from (etyl) (m), .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (label) Conflict; battle.
  • An outdoor place acting as temporary accommodation in tents or other temporary structures.
  • An organised event, often taking place in tents or temporary accommodation.
  • A base of a military group, not necessarily temporary.
  • A single hut or shelter.
  • a hunter's camp
  • The company or body of persons encamped.
  • * Macaulay
  • The camp broke up with the confusion of a flight.
  • A group of people with the same strong ideals or political leanings.
  • (uncommon) campus
  • (informal) A summer camp.
  • (agriculture) A mound of earth in which potatoes and other vegetables are stored for protection against frost; called also burrow and pie.
  • (UK, obsolete) An ancient game of football, played in some parts of England.
  • (Halliwell)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To fight; contend in battle or in any kind of contest; to strive with others in doing anything; compete.
  • To wrangle; argue.
  • To live in a tent or similar temporary accommodation.
  • We're planning to camp in the field until Sunday.
  • To set up a camp.
  • To afford rest or lodging for.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Had our great palace the capacity / To camp this host, we all would sup together.
  • (video games) To stay in an advantageous location in a video game, such as next to a power-up's spawning point or in order to guard an area.
  • The easiest way to win on this map is to camp the double damage.
    Go and camp the flag for the win.
    Derived terms
    * (l)

    Adjective

    (-)
  • of or related to a camp
  • Derived terms

    * camper * campness * campfire * camp site, campsite * campstead, campsteading * campground * campestral * concentration camp * death camp * extermination camp * fat camp * spawn camping * summer camp

    Etymology 2

    Believed to be from Polari, otherwise obscure.listed in the Oxford English Dictionary'', second edition (1989) Suggested origins include the 17th century French word ''camper'', 'to put oneself in a pose',Douglas Harper, "camp (adj.)"] in: ''Etymonline.com - Online Etymology Dictionary'', 2001ff an assumed dialectal English word ''camp'' or ''kemp'' meaning 'rough' or 'uncouth' and a derivation from ''camp'' (n.)Micheal Quinion, [http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-cam1.htm "Camp" in: ''World Wide Words , 2003

    Noun

    (-)
  • An affected]], [[exaggerate, exaggerated or intentionally tasteless style.
  • Adjective

    (er)
  • Theatrical; making exaggerated gestures.
  • (of a, man) Ostentatiously effeminate.
  • Intentionally tasteless or vulgar, self-parodying.
  • Derived Terms

    * camp it up * campy

    Statistics

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    Anagrams

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    References

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