Carked vs Calked - What's the difference?

carked | calked |


As verbs the difference between carked and calked

is that carked is (cark) while calked is (calk).

carked

English

Verb

(head)
  • (cark)
  • Anagrams

    * *

    cark

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To be filled with worry, solicitude, or troubles.
  • To bring worry, vexation, or anxiety.
  • *1831 , (Adam Clarke), VI p.600:
  • *:Carnal pleasures are the sins of youth: ambition and the love of power, the sins of middle age: covetousness and carking cares, the crimes of old age.
  • *
  • *:Thanks to that penny he had just spent so recklessly [on a newspaper] he would pass a happy hour, taken, for once, out of his anxious, despondent, miserable self. It irritated him shrewdly to know that these moments of respite from carking care would not be shared with his poor wife, with careworn, troubled Ellen.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A noxious or corroding worry.
  • * Spenser
  • His heavy head, devoid of careful cark .
  • * Motherwell
  • Fling cark and care aside.
  • * R. D. Blackmore
  • Freedom from the cares of money and the cark of fashion.
  • (obsolete) The state of being filled with worry.
  • Etymology 2

    From (caulk)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • References

    *

    Anagrams

    * ----

    calked

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (calk)
  • Anagrams

    *

    calk

    English

    Etymology 1

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A pointed projection on a horseshoe to prevent it slipping.
  • Verb

  • * 1915 April 1, in Gas Age , volume 35, page 328:
  • When a joint was calked , the bell piece was then separated,
  • To make an indentation in the edge of a metal plate, as along a seam in a steam boiler or an iron ship, to force the edge of the upper plate hard against the lower and so fill the crevice.
  • Etymology 2

    Ultimately from (etyl) (lena) .

    Alternative forms

    * (l)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To copy (a drawing) by rubbing the back of it with red or black chalk, and then passing a blunt stylus or needle over the lines, so as to leave a tracing on the paper or other thing against which it is laid or held.
  • Anagrams

    *