What's the difference between
and
Enter two words to compare and contrast their definitions, origins, and synonyms to better understand how those words are related.

Laked vs Caked - What's the difference?

laked | caked |

As verbs the difference between laked and caked

is that laked is past tense of lake while caked is past tense of cake.

As an adjective caked is

empty with nothing left to smoke but ash.

laked

English

Verb

(head)
  • (lake)
  • Anagrams

    *

    lake

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) . Despite their similarity in form and meaning, (etyl) lake is not related to (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A small stream of running water; a channel for water; a drain.
  • A large, landlocked stretch of water.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=Judge Short had gone to town, and Farrar was off for a three days' cruise up the lake . I was bitterly regretting I had not gone with him when the distant notes of a coach horn reached my ear, and I descried a four-in-hand winding its way up the inn road from the direction of Mohair.}}
  • A large amount of liquid; as , a wine lake.
  • * 1991 , (Robert DeNiro) (actor), :
  • So you punched out a window for ventilation. Was that before'' or ''after you noticed you were standing in a lake of gasoline?
    Synonyms
    * See also
    Derived terms
    * ephemeral lake * Great Lakes * Lake District * Lakes * lakeness * oxbow lake
    See also
    * billabong * lagoon * pond * tarn
    References
    * {{reference-book , last = Kenneth , first = Sisam , title = Fourteenth Century Verse and Prose , origyear = 2009 , publisher = BiblioBazaar , id = ISBN 1110730802, 9781110730803 }} * {{reference-book , last = Astell , first = Ann W. , title = Political allegory in late medieval England , origyear = 1999 , publisher = Cornell University Press , id = ISBN 0801435609, 9780801435607 , pages = 192 }} * {{reference-book , last = Cameron , first = Kenneth , title = English Place Names , origyear = 1961 , publisher = B. T. Batsford Limited , id = SBN 416 27990 2 , pages = 164 }} * {{reference-book , last = Maetzner , first = Eduard Adolf Ferdinand , title = An English Grammar; Methodical, Analytical, and Historical , origyear = 2009 , publisher = BiblioBazaar, LLC , id = ISBN 1113149965, 9781113149961 , pages = 200 }} * {{reference-book , last = Rissanen , first = Matti , title = History of Englishes: new methods and interpretations in historical linguistics , origyear = 1992 , publisher = Walter de Gruyter , id = ISBN 3110132168, 9783110132168 , pages = 513-514 }} * {{reference-book , last = Ferguson , first = Robert , title = English surnames: and their place in the Teutonic family , origyear = 1858 , publisher = G. Routledge & co. , pages = 368 }}

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) lake, lak, lac (also loke, laik, layke), from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) An offering, sacrifice, gift.
  • (dialectal) Play; sport; game; fun; glee.
  • Derived terms
    * bridelock * wedlock

    Verb

    (lak)
  • (obsolete) To present an offering.
  • (chiefly, dialectal) To leap, jump, exert oneself, play.
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl) lachen

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) Fine linen.
  • Etymology 4

    From (etyl) , referring to the number of insects that gather on the trees and make the resin seep out.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • In dyeing and painting, an often fugitive crimson or vermillion pigment derived from an organic colorant (cochineal or madder, for example) and an inorganic, generally metallic mordant.
  • Derived terms
    * lake-red

    Verb

    (lak)
  • To make lake-red.
  • Etymology 5

    Compare lek.

    Verb

    (lak)
  • (obsolete) To play; to sport.
  • Anagrams

    * kale * leak English terms with multiple etymologies ----

    caked

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (cake)
  • Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • (slang, smoking, of a pipe) Empty with nothing left to smoke but ash.
  • Synonyms

    *