Fadge vs Cadge - What's the difference?

fadge | cadge |


In geordie|lang=en terms the difference between fadge and cadge

is that fadge is (geordie) small bread loaf or bun made with left-over dough while cadge is (geordie) to beg.

As verbs the difference between fadge and cadge

is that fadge is (obsolete|intransitive) to be suitable ((with) or (to) something) while cadge is (geordie) to beg.

As nouns the difference between fadge and cadge

is that fadge is (ulster) irish potato bread - flat farls, griddle-baked often served fried while cadge is (falconry) a circular frame on which cadgers carry hawks for sale.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

fadge

English

Etymology 1

Origin unknown.

Verb

(fadg)
  • (obsolete) To be suitable ((with) or (to) something).
  • * Wycherley
  • Well, Sir, how fadges the new design?
  • (obsolete) To agree, to get along ((with)).
  • * Milton
  • They shall be made, spite of antipathy, to fadge together.
  • (obsolete) To get on well; to cope, to thrive.
  • *, II.17:
  • I can never fadge well: for I am at such a stay, that except for health and life, there is nothing I will take the paines to fret my selfe about, or will purchase at so high a rate as to trouble my wits for it, or be constrained thereunto.
  • (Geordie) To eat together.
  • (Yorkshire, of a horse) To move with a gait between a jog and a trot.
  • Etymology 2

    Etymology uncertain.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Ulster) Irish potato bread - flat farls, griddle-baked. Often served fried.
  • (New Zealand) A wool pack. traditionally made of jute now often synthetic.
  • (Geordie) Small bread loaf or bun made with left-over dough.
  • (Yorkshire) A gait of horses between a jog and a trot.
  • References

    * * * * * *

    cadge

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (falconry) A circular frame on which cadgers carry hawks for sale.
  • Verb

  • (Geordie) To beg.
  • "Are ye gannin te cadge a lift of yoer fatha?"
  • (US, British, slang) To obtain something by wit or guile; to convince someone to do something they might not normally do.
  • To carry hawks and other birds of prey.
  • * (seeCites)
  • (UK, Scotland, dialect) To carry, as a burden.
  • (Halliwell)
  • (UK, Scotland, dialect) To hawk or peddle, as fish, poultry, etc.
  • (UK, Scotland, dialect) To intrude or live on another meanly; to beg.
  • (Wright)

    Derived terms

    * cadger * codger

    Synonyms

    * (obtain from others) scrounge, bum

    References

    * *

    Anagrams

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