Cabin vs Shack - What's the difference?

cabin | shack | Synonyms |

Shack is a synonym of cabin.


In context|obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between cabin and shack

is that cabin is (obsolete) to live in, or as if in, a cabin; to lodge while shack is (obsolete) to feed in stubble, or upon waste.

As nouns the difference between cabin and shack

is that cabin is (us) a small dwelling characteristic of the frontier, especially when built from logs with simple tools and not constructed by professional builders, but by those who meant to live in it while shack is a crude, roughly built hut or cabin or shack can be (obsolete) grain fallen to the ground and left after harvest.

As verbs the difference between cabin and shack

is that cabin is to place in a cabin while shack is to live in or with; to shack up or shack can be (obsolete) to shed or fall, as corn or grain at harvest.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

cabin

English

(wikipedia cabin)

Noun

(en noun)
  • (lb) A small dwelling characteristic of the frontier, especially when built from logs with simple tools and not constructed by professional builders, but by those who meant to live in it.
  • :
  • *1994 , Michael Grumley, "Life Drawing" in Violet Quill
  • *:And that was how long we stayed in the cabin , pressed together, pulling the future out of each other, sweating and groaning and making sure each of us remembered.
  • (lb) A chalet or lodge, especially one that can hold large groups of people.
  • A compartment on land, usually comprised of logs.
  • A private room on a ship.
  • :
  • *
  • *:There is an hour or two, after the passengers have embarked, which is disquieting and fussy. Mail bags, so I understand, are being put on board. Stewards, carrying cabin trunks, swarm in the corridors. Passengers wander restlessly about or hurry, with futile energy, from place to place.
  • The interior of a boat, enclosed to create a small room, particularly for sleeping.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=10 , passage=Mr. Cooke had had a sloop?yacht built at Far Harbor, the completion of which had been delayed, and which was but just delivered. […] The Maria had a cabin , which was finished in hard wood and yellow plush, and accommodations for keeping things cold.}}
  • The passenger area of an airplane.
  • The section of a passenger plane having the same class of service.
  • A signal box.
  • A small room; an enclosed place.
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:So long in secret cabin there he held her captive.
  • Synonyms

    * cell * chamber * hut * pod * shack * shed

    Antonyms

    * hall * palace * villa

    See also

    * cabana

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To place in a cabin.
  • (obsolete) To live in, or as if in, a cabin; to lodge.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I'll make you cabin in a cave.

    shack

    English

    (wikipedia shack)

    Etymology 1

    Some authorities derive this word from (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A crude, roughly built hut or cabin.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1913, author=
  • , title=Lord Stranleigh Abroad , chapter=6 citation , passage=The men resided in a huge bunk house, which consisted of one room only, with a shack outside where the cooking was done. In the large room were a dozen bunks?; half of them in a very dishevelled state, […]}}
  • Any unpleasant, poorly constructed or poorly furnished building.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To live in or with; to shack up.
  • Etymology 2

    Obsolete variant of shake. Compare (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • (obsolete) Grain fallen to the ground and left after harvest.
  • (obsolete) Nuts which have fallen to the ground.
  • (obsolete) Freedom to pasturage in order to feed upon shack .
  • * 1918, Christobel Mary Hoare Hood, The History of an East Anglian Soke [http://books.google.com/books?ie=UTF-8&hl=en&vid=OCLC11859773&id=rI0iE-yqyAMC&q=%22right+to+shack%22&prev=http://books.google.com/books%3Flr%3D%26q%3D%2522right%2Bto%2Bshack%2522&pgis=1]
  • [...] first comes the case of tenants with a customary right to shack their sheep and cattle who have overburdened the fields with a larger number of beasts than their tenement entitles them to, or who have allowed their beasts to feed in the field out of shack time.
  • * 1996, J M Neeson, Commoners [http://books.google.com/books?ie=UTF-8&hl=en&vid=ISBN0521567742&id=2CqhjjiwLtEC&pg=PA76&lpg=PA76&sig=3geUREguU3vTYj_05PtAfzFODDA]
  • The fields were enclosed by Act in 1791, and Tharp gave the cottagers about thirteen acres for their right of shack .
  • (UK, US, dialect, obsolete) A shiftless fellow; a low, itinerant beggar; a vagabond; a tramp.
  • (Forby)
  • * Henry Ward Beecher
  • All the poor old shacks about the town found a friend in Deacon Marble.
    Derived terms
    * common of shack

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To shed or fall, as corn or grain at harvest.
  • (obsolete) To feed in stubble, or upon waste.
  • (Grose)
  • * 1918, Christobel Mary Hoare Hood, The History of an East Anglian Soke [http://books.google.com/books?ie=UTF-8&hl=en&vid=OCLC11859773&id=rI0iE-yqyAMC&q=%22right+to+shack%22&prev=http://books.google.com/books%3Flr%3D%26q%3D%2522right%2Bto%2Bshack%2522&pgis=1]
  • first comes the case of tenants with a customary right to shack their sheep and cattle who have overburdened the fields with a larger number of beasts than their tenement entitles them to, or who have allowed their beasts to feed in the field out of shack time.
  • (UK, dialect) To wander as a vagabond or tramp.
  • Anagrams

    *

    References