Receptor vs Butyrylcholine - What's the difference?

receptor | butyrylcholine |


As nouns the difference between receptor and butyrylcholine

is that receptor is (biochemistry|medicine) a protein on a cell wall that binds with specific molecules so that they can be absorbed into the cell in order to control certain functions while butyrylcholine is a synthetic acetylcholine-like molecule, with activation of some of the same receptors, which is hydrolysed by acetylcholinesterase and (more efficiently) by butyrylcholinesterase.

receptor

Alternative forms

* receptour (qualifier)

Noun

(en noun)
  • (biochemistry, medicine) A protein on a cell wall that binds with specific molecules so that they can be absorbed into the cell in order to control certain functions.
  • * 2001': In the target organ, the drug is recognised by ‘'''receptors ’. These are large molecules, usually proteins, to which the drug binds tightly and with a high degree of specificity. — Leslie Iversen, ''Drugs: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford 2001, p. 24)
  • (biology) Any specialized cell or structure that responds to sensory stimuli.
  • Derived terms

    * acetylcholine receptor * counterreceptor

    butyrylcholine

    English

    Noun

    (-) (wikipedia butyrylcholine)
  • A synthetic acetylcholine-like molecule, with activation of some of the same receptors, which is hydrolysed by acetylcholinesterase and (more efficiently) by butyrylcholinesterase.