Gird vs Buttress - What's the difference?

gird | buttress | Synonyms |

Gird is a synonym of buttress.


As verbs the difference between gird and buttress

is that gird is to bind with a flexible rope or cord or gird can be to jeer at while buttress is to support something physically with, or as if with, a prop or buttress.

As nouns the difference between gird and buttress

is that gird is a sarcastic remark while buttress is (architecture) a brick or stone structure built against another structure to support it.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

gird

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) .

Verb

  • To bind with a flexible rope or cord.
  • The fasces were girt about with twine in bundles large.
  • To encircle with, or as if with a belt.
  • The lady girt herself with silver chain, from which she hung a golden shear.
    Our home is girt by sea... -
  • To prepare oneself for an action.
  • Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sarcastic remark.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I thank thee for that gird , good Tranio.
  • A stroke with a rod or switch.
  • A severe spasm; a twinge; a pang.
  • * Tillotson
  • Conscience is freed from many fearful girds and twinges which the atheist feels.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To jeer at.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Being moved, he will not spare to gird the gods.
  • To jeer.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Men of all sorts take a pride to gird at me.

    buttress

    Noun

    (es)
  • (architecture) A brick or stone structure built against another structure to support it.
  • Anything that serves to support something; a prop.
  • (botany) A buttress-root.
  • (climbing) A feature jutting prominently out from a mountain or rock; a crag, a bluff.
  • * 2005 , Will Cook, Until Darkness Disappears , page 54:
  • All that day they rode into broken land. The prairie with its grass and rolling hills was behind them, and they entered a sparse, dry, rocky country, full of draws and short caƱons and ominous buttresses .
  • * 2010 , Tony Howard, Treks and Climbs in Wadi Rum, Jordan , ISBN-13: 9781852842543, page 84:
  • Two short pitches up a chimney-crack are followed by a traverse right to the centre of the buttress .
  • (figurative) Anything that supports or strengthens.
  • * South
  • the ground pillar and buttress of the good old cause of nonconformity

    Derived terms

    * flying buttress

    Synonyms

    * counterfort

    See also

    * nunatak

    Verb

    (es)
  • To support something physically with, or as if with, a prop or buttress.
  • To support something or someone by supplying evidence; to corroborate or substantiate.