Lodge vs Burrow - What's the difference?

lodge | burrow |


In mining|lang=en terms the difference between lodge and burrow

is that lodge is (mining) the space at the mouth of a level next to the shaft, widened to permit wagons to pass, or ore to be deposited for hoisting; called also platt while burrow is (mining) a heap or heaps of rubbish or refuse.

As nouns the difference between lodge and burrow

is that lodge is a building for recreational use such as a hunting lodge or a summer cabin while burrow is a tunnel or hole, often as dug by a small creature.

As verbs the difference between lodge and burrow

is that lodge is to be firmly fixed in a specified position while burrow is to dig a tunnel or hole.

lodge

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A building for recreational use such as a hunting lodge or a summer cabin.
  • Porter's]] or [[caretaker, caretaker's rooms at or near the main entrance to a building or an estate.
  • A local chapter of some fraternities]], such as [[freemason, freemasons.
  • (US) A local chapter of a trade union.
  • A rural hotel or resort, an inn.
  • A beaver's shelter constructed on a pond or lake.
  • A den or cave.
  • The chamber of an abbot, prior, or head of a college.
  • (mining) The space at the mouth of a level next to the shaft, widened to permit wagons to pass, or ore to be deposited for hoisting; called also platt.
  • (Raymond)
  • A collection of objects lodged together.
  • * De Foe
  • the Maldives, a famous lodge of islands
  • A family of Native Americans, or the persons who usually occupy an Indian lodge; as a unit of enumeration, reckoned from four to six persons.
  • The tribe consists of about two hundred lodges , that is, of about a thousand individuals.

    Verb

    (lodg)
  • To be firmly fixed in a specified position.
  • I've got some spinach lodged between my teeth.
    The bullet missed its target and lodged in the bark of a tree.
  • To stay in a boarding-house, paying rent to the resident landlord or landlady.
  • The detective Sherlock Holmes lodged in Baker Street.
  • To stay in any place or shelter.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Stay and lodge by me this night.
  • * Milton
  • Something holy lodges in that breast.
  • To supply with a room or place to sleep in for a time.
  • To put money, jewellery, or other valuables for safety.
  • To place (a statement, etc.) with the proper authorities (such as courts, etc.).
  • To become flattened, as grass or grain, when overgrown or beaten down by the wind.
  • The heavy rain caused the wheat to lodge .

    Derived terms

    * lodger * lodging * lodgement

    Anagrams

    *

    burrow

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A tunnel or hole, often as dug by a small creature.
  • * 1922 , (Margery Williams), (The Velveteen Rabbit)
  • But very soon he grew to like it, for the Boy used to talk to him, and made nice tunnels' for him under the bedclothes that he said were like the ' burrows the real rabbits lived in.
  • (mining) A heap or heaps of rubbish or refuse.
  • A mound.
  • An incorporated town.
  • (Webster 1913)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To dig a tunnel or hole.