Burden vs Acquit - What's the difference?

burden | acquit |


In context|obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between burden and acquit

is that burden is (obsolete) theme, core idea while acquit is (obsolete) to release, set free, rescue.

As verbs the difference between burden and acquit

is that burden is to encumber with a burden (in any of the noun senses of the word ) while acquit is to declare or find not guilty; innocent or acquit can be (archaic) past participle of acquit , set free, rid of.

As a noun burden

is a heavy load or burden can be (music) a phrase or theme that recurs at the end of each verse in a folk song or ballad.

burden

English

(wikipedia burden)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) burden, birden, burthen, birthen, byrthen, from (etyl) byrden, .

Alternative forms

* burthen (archaic)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A heavy load.
  • * 1898 , , (Moonfleet) Chapter 4
  • There were four or five men in the vault already, and I could hear more coming down the passage, and guessed from their heavy footsteps that they were carrying burdens .
  • A responsibility, onus.
  • A cause of worry; that which is grievous, wearisome, or oppressive.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • Deaf, giddy, helpless, left alone, / To all my friends a burden grown.
  • The capacity of a vessel, or the weight of cargo that she will carry.
  • a ship of a hundred tons burden
  • (mining) The tops or heads of stream-work which lie over the stream of tin.
  • (metalworking) The proportion of ore and flux to fuel, in the charge of a blast furnace.
  • (Raymond)
  • A fixed quantity of certain commodities.
  • A burden of gad steel is 120 pounds.
  • (obsolete, rare) A birth.
  • That bore thee at a burden two fair sons

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To encumber with a burden (in any of the noun senses of the word ).
  • to burden a nation with taxes
  • * Bible, 2 Corinthians viii. 13
  • I mean not that other men be eased, and ye burdened .
  • * Shakespeare
  • My burdened heart would break.
  • To impose, as a load or burden; to lay or place as a burden (something heavy or objectionable).
  • * Coleridge
  • It is absurd to burden this act on Cromwell.
    Derived terms
    * burdensome * beast of burden

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) bordon. See bourdon.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (music) A phrase or theme that recurs at the end of each verse in a folk song or ballad.
  • * 1610 , , act 1 scene 2
  • [...] Foot it featly here and there; / And, sweet sprites, the burden bear.
  • * 1846 ,
  • As commonly used, the refrain, or burden , not only is limited to lyric verse, but depends for its impression upon the force of monotone - both in sound and thought.
  • The drone of a bagpipe.
  • (Ruddiman)
  • (obsolete) Theme, core idea.
  • Anagrams

    *

    acquit

    English

    Alternative forms

    * acquite (archaic)

    Verb

  • To declare or find not guilty; innocent.
  • * '>citation
  • To set free, release or discharge from an obligation, duty, liability, burden, or from an accusation or charge.
  • The jury acquitted the prisoner ''of'' the charge.
  • * 1775 , , The Duenna
  • His poverty, can you acquit him of that?
  • * 1837 , , “Lord Bacon” in The Edinburgh Review , July 1837
  • If he [Bacon] was convicted, it was because it was impossible to acquit him without offering the grossest outrage to justice and common sense.
  • (obsolete, rare) To pay for; to atone for
  • * , line 1071
  • Till life to death acquit my forced offence.
  • To discharge, as a claim or debt; to clear off; to pay off; to requite, to fulfill.
  • * , 1200
  • Aquyte him wel, for goddes love,’ quod he;
  • * 1640 , , Tasso
  • Midst foes (as champion of the faith) he ment / That palme or cypress should his painees acquite .
  • * 1836 , , Orations I-382
  • I admit it to be not so much the duty as the privilege of an American citizen to acquit this obligation to the memory of his fathers with discretion and generosity.
  • * 1844 , ” in Essays: second series
  • We see young men who owe us a new world, so readily and lavishly they promise, but they never acquit the debt; they die young and dodge the account: or if they live, they lose themselves in the crowd.
  • (reflexive) To clear one’s self.
  • * , III-ii
  • Pray God he may acquit him of suspicion!
  • (reflexive) To bear or conduct one’s self; to perform one’s part.
  • The soldier acquitted himself well in battle.
    The orator acquitted himself very poorly.
  • * November 2 2014 , Daniel Taylor, " Sergio Agüero strike wins derby for Manchester City against 10-man United," guardian.co.uk
  • Van Gaal responded by replacing Adnan Januzaj with Carrick and, in fairness, the emergency centre-half did exceedingly well given that he has not played since May. McNair also acquitted himself well after Rojo was injured sliding into a challenge with Martín Demichelis
  • * 1766 , , The vicar of Wakefield , xiv
  • Though this was one of the first mercantile transactions of my life, yet I had no doubt about acquitting myself with reputation.
  • (obsolete) To release, set free, rescue.
  • * , I-vii-52
  • Till I have acquit your captive Knight.
  • (archaic)
  • * , I-iii
  • I am glad I am so acquit of this tinder box.

    Synonyms

    * absolve * clear * exonerate * innocent * exculpate * release * discharge

    Derived terms

    * acquital, acquittal

    Antonyms

    * (to declare innocent) condemn, convict