Cool vs Bull - What's the difference?

cool | bull |


As an acronym cool

is (computing) clips object]]-oriented [[language|language .

As a proper noun bull is

.

cool

English

Alternative forms

* (slang) coo, kewl, kool, qewl, qool

Etymology 1

From (etyl), from (etyl) . Related to (l).

Adjective

(er)
  • Having a slightly low temperature; mildly or pleasantly cold.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=8 , passage=The day was cool and snappy for August, and the Rise all green with a lavish nature. Now we plunged into a deep shade with the boughs lacing each other overhead, and crossed dainty, rustic bridges over the cold trout-streams, the boards giving back the clatter of our horses' feet:
  • Allowing or suggesting heat relief.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=2 citation , passage=Now that she had rested and had fed from the luncheon tray Mrs. Broome had just removed, she had reverted to her normal gaiety.  She looked cool in a grey tailored cotton dress with a terracotta scarf and shoes and her hair a black silk helmet.}}
  • Of a person, not showing emotion, calm and in self-control.
  • Unenthusiastic, lukewarm, skeptical.
  • Calmly audacious.
  • * (Nathaniel Hawthorne) (1804-1864)
  • Its cool stare of familiarity was intolerable.
  • * 1944 November 28, Irving Brecher and Fred F. Finklehoffe, Meet Me in St. Louis , Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer:
  • My father was talking to the World's Fair Commission yesterday, and they estimate it's going to cost a cool fifty million.
  • (label) Of a person, knowing what to do and how to behave; considered popular by others.
  • (label) In fashion, part of or fitting the in crowd; originally hipster slang.
  • * 2008 , Lou Schuler, "Foreward", in'' Nate Green, ''Built for Show , page xii
  • The fact that I was middle-aged, bald, married, and raising girls instead of chasing them didn't really bother me. Muscles are cool at any age.
  • (label) Of an action, all right; acceptable; that does not present a problem.
  • (label) A dismissal of a comment perceived as boring or pointless.
  • (label) Of a person, not upset by circumstances that might ordinarily be upsetting.
  • * (Henry Fielding) (1707-1754)
  • He had lost a cool hundred.
  • * (Charles Dickens) (1812-1870)
  • leaving a cool four thousand to Mr. Matthew Pocket
    Synonyms
    * (having a slightly low temperature) chilly * (not showing emotion) distant, phlegmatic, standoffish, unemotional * (in fashion) ** (standard) , fashionable, in fashion, modish, stylish ** (colloquial or slang) happening, hip, in, trendy * (acceptable) acceptable, all right, OK * (not upset) easy, fine, not bothered, not fussed'''
    Antonyms
    * (having a slightly low temperature) lukewarm, tepid, warm * (not showing emotion) passionate * (knowing what to do and how to behave) awkward, uncool * (in fashion) , old hat, out, out of fashion * (acceptable) not cricket (UK), not on, unacceptable * (not upset) bothered, upset * (unenthusiastic) warm
    Derived terms
    * cool head * coolish * coolly * coolness * keep one's cool * lose one's cool * uncool
    Quotations
    * The earliest use of the word in this way seems to be in ' "The Moonstone" 1868: *: "She has been a guest of yours at this house," I answered. "May I venture to suggest — if nothing was said about me beforehand — that I might see her here?" *: "Cool!" said Mr. Bruff. With that one word of comment on the reply that I had made to him, he took another turn up and down the room. *: "In plain English," he said, "my house is to be turned into a trap to catch Rachel ... * In 1602, Shakespeare wrote that Queen Gertrude told Hamlet: *: "O gentle son, Upon the heat and flame of thy distemper, Sprinkle cool patience."

    Noun

    (-)
  • A moderate or refreshing state of cold; moderate temperature of the air between hot and cold; coolness.
  • in the cool of the morning
  • A calm temperament.
  • Synonyms
    *(calm temperament) calmness, composure

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) colen, from (etyl) , altered to resemble the adjective cool. See (l).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (literally) To lose heat, to get colder.
  • I like to let my tea cool before drinking it so I don't burn my tongue.
  • To make cooler, less warm.
  • * Bible, Luke xvi. 24:
  • Send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, and cool my tongue.
  • (figuratively) To become less intense, e.g. less amicable or passionate.
  • Relations cooled between the USA and the USSR after 1980.
  • To make less intense, e.g. less amicable or passionate.
  • * Shakespeare:
  • We have reason to cool our raging motions, our carnal stings, our unbitted lusts.
    Derived terms
    * coolant * cooler * cooling * cool off * cool down * cool it * cool one's heels * cool one's jets

    Anagrams

    * * 1000 English basic words ----

    bull

    English

    (wikipedia bull)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) bul, bule, from (etyl) . More at blow.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An adult male of domesticated cattle or oxen.
  • #Specifically, one that is uncastrated.
  • An adult male of certain large mammals, such as whales, elephants and seals.
  • A large, strong man.
  • (lb) An investor who buys (commodities or securities) in anticipation of a rise in prices.
  • (lb) A policeman.
  • *
  • *:The Bat—they called him the Bat.. He'd never been in stir, the bulls had never mugged him, he didn't run with a mob, he played a lone hand, and fenced his stuff so that even the fence couldn't swear he knew his face.
  • *1859 ,
  • *:Half-a-crown'' is known as an (alderman), (half a bull), (half a tusheroon), and a (madza caroon); whilst a ''crown'' piece, or ''five shillings , may be called either a (bull), or a (caroon), or a (cartwheel), or a (coachwheel), or a (thick-un), or a (tusheroon).
  • A man.
  • Synonyms
    * guy, dude, bro, cat * cop, copper, pig (derogatory''), rozzer (''British ). See also
    Antonyms
    * bear
    Coordinate terms
    * cow, ox, calf, steer

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Large and strong, like a bull.
  • Of large mammals, male.
  • a bull elephant
  • (finance) Of a market in which prices are rising (compare bear)
  • Synonyms
    * (large and strong) beefy, hunky, robust * (male): male
    Antonyms
    * (large and strong): feeble, puny, weak * (male): female * (of a market): bear

    Verb

  • To force oneself (in a particular direction).
  • He bulled his way in .
  • To lie, to tell untruths.
  • To be in heat; to manifest sexual desire as cows do.
  • (UK, military) To polish boots to a high shine.
  • (finance) To endeavour to raise the market price of.
  • to bull railroad bonds
  • (finance) To endeavour to raise prices in.
  • to bull the market

    Derived terms

    * bulldog * bulldozer * bulldust * bullfrog * bullhorn * bull in a china shop * bullseye * bullshit * bull wheel * shoot the bull * take the bull by the horns

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) bulle'', from (etyl) ''bulle'', from Low (etyl) ''bulla

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A papal bull, an official document or edict from the Pope.
  • A seal affixed to a document, especially a document from the Pope.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • to publish in a Papal bull
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl) . Popularly associated with (bullshit).

    Noun

    (-)
  • A lie.
  • (euphemistic, informal) Nonsense.
  • Synonyms
    * (nonsense) See also

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • to mock, cheat
  • Etymology 4

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • a bubble
  • ----