Stage vs Build - What's the difference?

stage | build |


As nouns the difference between stage and build

is that stage is a phase while build is (senseid) the physique of a human body; constitution or structure of a human body.

As verbs the difference between stage and build

is that stage is to produce on a stage, to perform a play while build is (lb) to form (something) by combining materials or parts.

stage

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A phase.
  • * (1800-1859)
  • Such a polity is suited only to a particular stage in the progress of society.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-28, author=(Joris Luyendijk)
  • , volume=189, issue=3, page=21, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Our banks are out of control , passage=Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic […].  Until 2008 there was denial over what finance had become. […]  But the scandals kept coming, and so we entered stage three – what therapists call "bargaining". A broad section of the political class now recognises the need for change but remains unable to see the necessity of a fundamental overhaul. Instead it offers fixes and patches.}}
  • The area, in any theatre, generally raised, upon which an audience watches plays or other public ceremonies.
  • * (Alexander Pope) (1688-1744)
  • Knights, squires, and steeds must enter on the stage .
  • * (1791–1875)
  • Lo! Where the stage , the poor, degraded stage, / Holds its warped mirror to a gaping age.
  • A floor or storey of a house.
  • (Wyclif)
  • A floor elevated for the convenience of mechanical work, etc.; scaffolding; staging.
  • A platform, often floating, serving as a kind of wharf.
  • A stagecoach, an enclosed horsedrawn carriage used to carry passengers.
  • * (William Cowper) (1731-1800)
  • a parcel sent you by the stage
  • * (Jonathan Swift) (1667–1745)
  • I went in the sixpenny stage .
  • (label) A place of rest on a regularly travelled road; a station; a place appointed for a relay of horses.
  • (label) A degree of advancement in a journey; one of several portions into which a road or course is marked off; the distance between two places of rest on a road.
  • * Jeffrey
  • A stage signifies a certain distance on a road.
  • * 1858 , (Samuel Smiles), (Robert Stephenson), The Life of George Stephenson: Railway Engineer , p.356
  • He travelled by gig, with his wife, his favourite horse performing the journey by easy stages .
  • *{{quote-book, year=1910, author=(Emerson Hough)
  • , title= The Purchase Price, chapter=3 , passage=The Mount Vernon , favoured by a good stage of water, soon cleared the narrow Monongahela channel, passed the confluence, and headed down under full steam, […].}}
  • (label) The number of an electronic circuit’s block, such as a filter, an amplifier, etc.
  • The place on a microscope where the slide is located for viewing.
  • (label) A level; one of the sequential areas making up the game.
  • A place where anything is publicly exhibited, or a remarkable affair occurs; the scene.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • When we are born, we cry that we are come / To this stage of fools.
  • * (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • Music and ethereal mirth / Wherewith the stage of air and earth did ring.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 2, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC
  • , title= Bulgaria 0-3 England , passage=Rooney's United team-mate Chris Smalling was given his debut at right-back and was able to adjust to the international stage in relatively relaxed fashion as Bulgaria barely posed a threat of any consequence.}}

    Synonyms

    * (phase) tier, level

    Derived terms

    * sage on the stage * stagecoach * stage-door Johnny * stage whisper * staging area

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • To produce on a stage, to perform a play.
  • The local theater group will stage "Pride and Prejudice".
  • To demonstrate in a deceptive manner.
  • The salesman’s demonstration of the new cleanser was staged to make it appear highly effective.
  • (Of a protest or strike etc.) To carry out.
  • To cause to pause or wait at a designated location.
  • We staged the cars to be ready for the start, then waited for the starter to drop the flag.
    to stage data to be written at a later time

    Anagrams

    * * ----

    build

    English

    Verb

  • (lb) To form (something) by combining materials or parts.
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked home all the way, foaming and raging. No omnibus, cab, or conveyance ever built could contain a young man in such a rage. His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn.
  • *
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients, chapter=1 , passage=A chap named Eleazir Kendrick and I had chummed in together the summer afore and built a fish-weir and shanty at Setuckit Point, down Orham way. For a spell we done pretty well.}}
  • To develop or give form to (something) according to a plan or process.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-21, author=(Oliver Burkeman)
  • , volume=189, issue=2, page=27, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= The tao of tech , passage=The dirty secret of the internet is that all this distraction and interruption is immensely profitable. Web companies like to boast about […], or offering services that let you
  • (lb) To increase or strengthen (something) by adding gradually to.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= The attack of the MOOCs , passage=Since the launch early last year of […] two Silicon Valley start-ups offering free education through MOOCs, massive open online courses, the ivory towers of academia have been shaken to their foundations. University brands built in some cases over centuries have been forced to contemplate the possibility that information technology will rapidly make their existing business model obsolete.}}
  • (lb) To establish a basis for (something).
  • (lb) To form by combining materials or parts.
  • (lb) To develop in magnitude or extent.
  • Usage notes

    * The simple past tense and past participle used to be builded; however, that form is now archaic, having been superseded by the form .

    Synonyms

    * (to form by combining materials or parts) construct, erect * (to develop or give form to according to a plan or process) create * (to increase or strengthen by adding gradually to) build up, enlarge, increase, strengthen * (to establish a basis for) base, found, ground

    Antonyms

    * (to form by combining materials or parts) demolish, destroy, ruin, wreck * (to increase or strengthen by adding gradually to) decrease, dissipate, weaken

    Derived terms

    * build a fire under * build castles in the air * build in * build into * build on * build on sand * build-to * build up * build upon * prebuild

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (senseid) The physique of a human body; constitution or structure of a human body.
  • Rugby players are of sturdy build .
  • (computing) any of various versions of a software product as it is being developed for release to users
  • The computer company has introduced a new prototype build to beta testers.
  • (Internet slang) a structure, nominally an abbreviation of building (see usage notes below).
  • I made a build that looked like the Parthenon in that game.

    Usage notes

    * As internet slang, although the word is nominally an abbreviation of "building", the slang term can refer to any structure or formation created by the player e.g. a statue, a pool, or even a forest.