Buffoonery vs Monkeyshine - What's the difference?

buffoonery | monkeyshine |


As nouns the difference between buffoonery and monkeyshine

is that buffoonery is foolishness, silliness; the behaviour expected of a buffoon while monkeyshine is a trick or prank like a monkey's; mischief; buffoonery; tomfoolery; monkeyism; shenanigans.

buffoonery

English

Noun

(buffooneries)
  • foolishness, silliness; the behaviour expected of a buffoon.
  • * 1693 : William Congreve, The Old Bachelor
  • Araminta, come, I'll talk seriously to you now; could you but see with my eyes the buffoonery of one scene of address, a lover, set out with all his equipage and appurtenances; ...
  • * 1814 : Jane Austen, Mansfield Park
  • One could not expect anybody to take such a part. Nothing but buffoonery from beginning to end.
  • * before 1891 : P.T. Barnum, quoted in The Life of Phineas T. Barnum [http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/1576]
  • The Temperance Reform was too serious a matter for trifling jokes and buffooneries .

    monkeyshine

    English

    Alternative forms

    * monkey-shine

    Noun

    (monkeyshines)
  • A trick or prank like a monkey's; mischief; buffoonery; tomfoolery; monkeyism; shenanigans.
  • I have seen about as many monkeyshines from you as I will tolerate.
  • * 1878 : , XIII. 435.
  • You may have noticed barefooted boys cutting up monkey-shines on trees with entire safety to themselves.

    References

    *