Bludges vs Budges - What's the difference?

bludges | budges |


As verbs the difference between bludges and budges

is that bludges is (bludge) while budges is (budge).

bludges

English

Verb

(head)
  • (bludge)

  • bludge

    English

    Noun

    (-)
  • (Australia, New Zealand, slang) The act of bludging.
  • * 2007 , Anne Barry, Playing with Fire , page 136,
  • A friend offered him a job working as a handyman in his carpet factory – a Mr Fix-it. Effectively off the bludge and back on track.
  • (Australia, New Zealand, slang) Easy work.
  • * 1997 , Wendy Morgan, Critical Literacy in the Classroom: The Art of the Possible , page 145,
  • Oh, my name is Gecko and I just thought the whole unit was a bludge , sometimes it got really boring. But like I said I could just fall asleep and let my group members do all the work. And still almost pass.
  • * 2011 , Irini Savvides, Sky Legs , unnumbered page,
  • ‘Seriously, you?ve got sheep at school?’ I said.
    ‘Yeah, heaps of kids here do Ag. Reckon it?s a big bludge , like drama.’

    Synonyms

    * (easy work) doddle

    Verb

    (bludg)
  • (Australia, obsolete, slang) To live off the earnings of a prostitute.
  • (Australia, New Zealand, slang) To not earn one's keep, to live off someone else or off welfare when one could be working.
  • (Australia, New Zealand, slang) To avoid one's responsibilities; to leave it to others to perform duties that one is expected to perform.
  • * 1999 , Tony Shillitoe, Joy Ride , page 64,
  • The second last Thursday in first term of Year Nine, Jason and I bludged' school for the first time together. It wasn't Jason's first time. He ' bludged school regularly, but I never used to miss days unless I was really sick.
  • * 2002 , , Anne Gray (editor), The Diaries of Donald Friend , Volume 1, page 343,
  • One of the mess orderlies had consistently bludged on the rest of us all day.
  • (Australia, New Zealand, slang) To do nothing, to be idle, especially when there is work to be done.
  • * 1967 , , Parliamentary Debates , page 3164,
  • We had the member for Piako saying as recently as last year, when dealing with social security benefits and increases, “I feel myself that when we have able-bodied men and women who would bludge and draw the pension, there is something wrong.”
  • * 1998 , Marion Halligan, Rosanne Fitzgibbon, The gift of story: Three decades of UQP short stories , page 96,
  • Now, you get back out there and you bludge ! I don't want to see anyone working, OK? I don't want to see any pick-axes, any hammers, or nothing.
  • * 2004 , John Smyth, Robert Hattam, et al., ‘Dropping Out,’ Drifting Off, Being Excluded: Becoming Somebody Without School , page 53,
  • I mean, school?s like a job. If you work for it you get your grades; if you work your hours you get your money. But if you bludge, you don't get money; if you bludge you don't get any grades. That's something that I didn't realize when I was young.
  • (Australia, New Zealand, slang) To take some benefit and give nothing in return.
  • Can I bludge a cigarette off you?
  • * 1983 , , The Unknown Great Australian and other psychobiographical portraits , page 105,
  • Gabriel was a classic bludger. He was a drop-out in the very modern sense of the word. The Rossettis were anything but well-heeled. Solid old brother William kept the show on the road. Gabriel bludged' on the family. He ' bludged on his mates.
  • * 2004 , Gillian Cowlishaw, Blackfellas, Whitefellas, and the Hidden Injuries of Race , page 135,
  • Now an adult with his own family, this man has become conscious of different norms among his children's white friends, and that whites often see sharing as bludging .

    Synonyms

    * (live off someone else) freeload, sponge * (sense, avoid one's responsibilities) shirk * (be idle) lounge * (take without giving back) cadge, scrounge

    Synonyms

    * (do nothing) idle, laze, lounge

    Anagrams

    * *

    budges

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (budge)
  • Anagrams

    *

    budge

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) bouger.

    Alternative forms

    * budg (obsolete)

    Verb

    (budg)
  • To move.
  • I’ve been pushing this rock as hard as I can, but it won’t budge an inch.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I'll not budge an inch, boy.
  • * 2014 , Jacob Steinberg, " Wigan shock Manchester City in FA Cup again to reach semi-finals", The Guardian , 9 March 2014:
  • Yet goals in either half from Jordi Gómez and James Perch inspired them and then, in the face of a relentless City onslaught, they simply would not budge , throwing heart, body and soul in the way of a ball which seemed destined for their net on several occasions.
  • To move.
  • I’ve been pushing this rock as hard as I can, but I can’t budge it.
  • To yield in one’s opinions or beliefs.
  • The Minister for Finance refused to budge on the new economic rules.
  • To try to improve the spot of a decision on a sports field.
  • Derived terms
    * budge up * budger
    Synonyms
    * shift

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Brisk; stirring; jocund.
  • (South)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • A kind of fur prepared from lambskin dressed with the wool on, formerly used as an edging and ornament, especially on scholastic habits.
  • * Milton
  • They are become so liberal, as to part freely with their own budge -gowns from off their backs.

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (obsolete) austere or stiff, like scholastics
  • * Milton
  • Those budge doctors of the stoic fur.
    Derived terms
    * budge bachelor * budge barrel (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    *