Plod vs Budge - What's the difference?

plod | budge | Related terms |

Plod is a related term of budge.


In lang=en terms the difference between plod and budge

is that plod is to trudge over or through while budge is to move.

In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between plod and budge

is that plod is (obsolete) a puddle while budge is (obsolete) austere or stiff, like scholastics.

As nouns the difference between plod and budge

is that plod is a slow or labored walk or other motion or activity or plod can be (obsolete) a puddle or plod can be the police, police officers while budge is a kind of fur prepared from lambskin dressed with the wool on, formerly used as an edging and ornament, especially on scholastic habits.

As verbs the difference between plod and budge

is that plod is to walk or move slowly and heavily or laboriously (+ on, through, over) while budge is to move.

As an adjective budge is

(obsolete) brisk; stirring; jocund or budge can be (obsolete) austere or stiff, like scholastics.

plod

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) *.

Noun

(-)
  • A slow or labored walk or other motion or activity.
  • We started at a brisk walk and ended at a plod .

    Verb

    (plodd)
  • To walk or move slowly and heavily or laboriously (+ on, through, over).
  • * 1883 , (Robert Louis Stevenson), (Treasure Island) Part One, Chapter 1
  • ** I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the inn door, his sea chest following behind him in a handbarrow;
  • To trudge over or through.
  • To toil; to drudge; especially, to study laboriously and patiently.
  • * Drayton
  • plodding schoolmen
    Derived terms
    * (l) * (l) * (English Citations of "plod")

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) plod. Cognate with (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A puddle.
  • Etymology 3

    From (PC Plod)

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • the police, police officers
  • (UK, mildly, derogatory, countable) a police officer, especially a low-ranking one.
  • Synonyms
    * (the police) see * (police officer) see

    budge

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) bouger.

    Alternative forms

    * budg (obsolete)

    Verb

    (budg)
  • To move.
  • I’ve been pushing this rock as hard as I can, but it won’t budge an inch.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I'll not budge an inch, boy.
  • * 2014 , Jacob Steinberg, " Wigan shock Manchester City in FA Cup again to reach semi-finals", The Guardian , 9 March 2014:
  • Yet goals in either half from Jordi Gómez and James Perch inspired them and then, in the face of a relentless City onslaught, they simply would not budge , throwing heart, body and soul in the way of a ball which seemed destined for their net on several occasions.
  • To move.
  • I’ve been pushing this rock as hard as I can, but I can’t budge it.
  • To yield in one’s opinions or beliefs.
  • The Minister for Finance refused to budge on the new economic rules.
  • To try to improve the spot of a decision on a sports field.
  • Derived terms
    * budge up * budger
    Synonyms
    * shift

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Brisk; stirring; jocund.
  • (South)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • A kind of fur prepared from lambskin dressed with the wool on, formerly used as an edging and ornament, especially on scholastic habits.
  • * Milton
  • They are become so liberal, as to part freely with their own budge -gowns from off their backs.

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (obsolete) austere or stiff, like scholastics
  • * Milton
  • Those budge doctors of the stoic fur.
    Derived terms
    * budge bachelor * budge barrel (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    *