Hump vs Budge - What's the difference?

hump | budge | Related terms |

Hump is a related term of budge.


As a proper noun hump

is the himalayas, as the challenge for the supply route between india and china.

As a verb budge is

to move.

As an adjective budge is

(obsolete) brisk; stirring; jocund or budge can be (obsolete) austere or stiff, like scholastics.

As a noun budge is

a kind of fur prepared from lambskin dressed with the wool on, formerly used as an edging and ornament, especially on scholastic habits.

hump

English

Noun

(wikipedia hump) (en noun)
  • A mound of earth.
  • A rounded mass, especially a fleshy mass such as on a camel.
  • A speed hump.
  • (rft-sense) A deformity in humans caused by abnormal curvature of the upper spine.
  • (slang) An act of sexual intercourse.
  • (British, slang) A bad mood.
  • get the hump''', have the '''hump''', take the '''hump .
  • (slang) A painfully boorish person.
  • That guy is such a hump !

    Synonyms

    * (abnormal deformity of the spine) gibbous, humpback, hunch, hunchback

    See also

    * over the hump * hump day * speed hump

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To bend something into a hump.
  • (slang) To carry something, especially with some exertion.
  • (slang) To carry, especially with some exertion.
  • (intransitive) To dry-hump.
  • (slang) To have sex with.
  • (slang) To have sex.
  • Derived terms

    * dry-hump

    budge

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) bouger.

    Alternative forms

    * budg (obsolete)

    Verb

    (budg)
  • To move.
  • I’ve been pushing this rock as hard as I can, but it won’t budge an inch.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I'll not budge an inch, boy.
  • * 2014 , Jacob Steinberg, " Wigan shock Manchester City in FA Cup again to reach semi-finals", The Guardian , 9 March 2014:
  • Yet goals in either half from Jordi Gómez and James Perch inspired them and then, in the face of a relentless City onslaught, they simply would not budge , throwing heart, body and soul in the way of a ball which seemed destined for their net on several occasions.
  • To move.
  • I’ve been pushing this rock as hard as I can, but I can’t budge it.
  • To yield in one’s opinions or beliefs.
  • The Minister for Finance refused to budge on the new economic rules.
  • To try to improve the spot of a decision on a sports field.
  • Derived terms
    * budge up * budger
    Synonyms
    * shift

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Brisk; stirring; jocund.
  • (South)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • A kind of fur prepared from lambskin dressed with the wool on, formerly used as an edging and ornament, especially on scholastic habits.
  • * Milton
  • They are become so liberal, as to part freely with their own budge -gowns from off their backs.

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (obsolete) austere or stiff, like scholastics
  • * Milton
  • Those budge doctors of the stoic fur.
    Derived terms
    * budge bachelor * budge barrel (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    *