Rude vs Brute - What's the difference?

rude | brute |


As a proper noun rude

is settlement in croatia, near zagreb.

As a noun brute is

.

rude

English

(mismatch between senses and translations)

Adjective

(er)
  • bad-mannered
  • The girl was so rude to her boyfriend by screaming at him for no reason.
  • Somewhat obscene, pornographic, offensive.
  • tough, robust.
  • undeveloped, unskilled, basic.
  • * 2 Corinthians 11:6 (KVJ)
  • But though I be rude in speech, yet not in knowledge
  • * (rfdate), Rudyard Kipling, The Conundrum of the Workshops
  • When the flush of a new-born sun fell first on Eden's green and gold,
    Our father Adam sat under the Tree and scratched with a stick in the mould;
    And the first rude sketch that the world had seen was joy to his mighty heart,
    Till the Devil whispered behind the leaves, "It's pretty, but is it Art?"
  • * 1767 , Adam Ferguson, An Essay on the History of Civil Society
  • It might be apprehended, that among rude nations, where the means of subsistence are procured with so much difficulty, the mind could never raise itself above the consideration of this subject
  • hearty, vigorous; (found particularly in the phrase rude health).
  • Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * rudeness

    Anagrams

    * 1000 English basic words ----

    brute

    English

    (wikipedia brute)

    Adjective

    (more)
  • Without reason or intelligence (of animals).
  • a brute beast
  • Characteristic of unthinking animals; senseless, unreasoning (of humans).
  • * Milton
  • A creature not prone / And brute as other creatures, but endued / With sanctity of reason.
  • Being unconnected with intelligence or thought; purely material, senseless.
  • the brute''' earth; the '''brute powers of nature
  • Crude, unpolished.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • a great brute farmer from Liddesdale
  • *
  • Strong, blunt, and spontaneous.
  • I punched him with brute force.
  • Brutal; cruel; fierce; ferocious; savage; pitiless.
  • brute violence

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • * 1714 , (Bernard Mandeville), The Fable of the Bees :
  • they laid before them how unbecoming it was the Dignity of such sublime Creatures to be sollicitous about gratifying those Appetites, which they had in common with Brutes , and at the same time unmindful of those higher qualities that gave them the preeminence over all visible Beings.
  • * 1946 , (Bertrand Russell), History of Western Philosophy , I.17:
  • But if he lives badly, he will, in the next life, be a woman; if he (or she) persists in evil-doing, he (or she) will become a brute , and go on through transmigrations until at last reason conquers.
  • A person with the characteristics of an unthinking animal; a coarse or brutal person.
  • One of them was a hulking brute of a man, heavily tattooed and with a hardened face that practically screamed "I just got out of jail."
  • *
  • She was frankly disappointed. For some reason she had thought to discover a burglar of one or another accepted type—either a dashing cracksman in full-blown evening dress, lithe, polished, pantherish, or a common yegg, a red-eyed, unshaven burly brute in the rags and tatters of a tramp.
  • (archaic, slang, UK, Cambridge University) One who has not yet matriculated.
  • Derived terms

    * brutal * brutality * brute force * brutish

    Verb

    (brut)
  • Anagrams

    * ----