Levee vs Brook - What's the difference?

levee | brook |


As a verb levee

is .

As a proper noun brook is

for someone living by a brook .

levee

English

(wikipedia levee)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • An embankment to prevent inundation; as, the levees along the Mississippi.
  • (US) The steep bank of a river, or border of an irrigated field.
  • (US) A pier or other landing place on a river.
  • Synonyms
    * (embankment) dike, floodwall

    Verb

  • (US) To keep within a channel by means of levees.
  • to levee a river

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) The act of rising; getting up, especially in the morning after rest.
  • * Gray
  • the sun's levee
  • * 1749 , Henry Fielding, Tom Jones , Folio Society 1973, p. 414:
  • The sturdy hind now attends the levee of his fellow-labourer the ox
  • A reception of visitors held after getting up.
  • A formal reception, especially one given by royalty or other leaders.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1992 , year_published=1993 , author= Hilary Mantel , title=A Place of Greater Safety citation , isbn=9780689121685 , page=195 , passage=At the King's levee on the morning of the 13th, Philippe was first ignored; then asked by His Majesty (rudely) what he wanted; then told, ‘Get back where you came from.’ }}

    Verb

  • To attend the levee or levees of.
  • * Young
  • He levees all the great.
    ----

    brook

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To use; enjoy; have the full employment of.
  • To earn; deserve.
  • (label) To bear; endure; support; put up with; tolerate (usually used in the negative, with an abstract noun as object ).
  • * {{quote-book, year=1922, author=(Ben Travers)
  • , chapter=6, title= A Cuckoo in the Nest , passage=But Sophia's mother was not the woman to brook defiance. After a few moments' vain remonstrance her husband complied. His manner and appearance were suggestive of a satiated sea-lion.}}
  • * 2005 , Nicholas Ostler, Empires of the Word: A Language History of the World , Harper:
  • Nevertheless, Garcilaso does claim that the Spaniards ‘who were unable to brook the length of the discourse, had left their places and fallen on the Indians’.
    Derived terms
    *

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl), from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A body of running water smaller than a river; a small stream.
  • *Bible, (w) viii. 7
  • *:The Lord thy God bringeth thee into a good land, a land of brooks of water.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:empties itself, as doth an inland brook / into the main of waters
  • *
  • *:But then I had the [massive] flintlock by me for protection. ¶.
  • A water meadow.
  • Low, marshy ground.
  • Synonyms
    * beck * burn * coulee * creek * stream