Leet vs Brook - What's the difference?

leet | brook |


As a noun leet

is (scotland) a portion or list, especially a list of candidates for an office or leet can be (british|obsolete) a regular court in which the certain lords had jurisdiction over local disputes, or the physical area of this jurisdiction or leet can be (zoology) the european pollock or leet can be (internet slang).

As a verb leet

is (obsolete) (let).

As an adjective leet

is of or relating to leetspeak.

As a proper noun brook is

for someone living by a brook .

leet

English

(wikipedia leet)

Etymology 1

Compare (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • (Scotland) A portion or list, especially a list of candidates for an office.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl)

    Verb

    (head)
  • (obsolete) (let)
  • Etymology 3

    Originated 1400–50 from late (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (British, obsolete) A regular court in which the certain lords had jurisdiction over local disputes, or the physical area of this jurisdiction.
  • Etymology 4

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (zoology) The European pollock.
  • Etymology 5

    An aphetic form of (elite).

    Alternative forms

    * .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Internet slang)
  • Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Of or relating to leetspeak.
  • (slang) Possessing outstanding skill in a field; expert, masterful.
  • (slang) Having superior social rank over others; upper class, elite.
  • (slang) Awesome, typically to describe a feat of skill; cool, sweet.
  • References

    * *

    brook

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To use; enjoy; have the full employment of.
  • To earn; deserve.
  • (label) To bear; endure; support; put up with; tolerate (usually used in the negative, with an abstract noun as object ).
  • * {{quote-book, year=1922, author=(Ben Travers)
  • , chapter=6, title= A Cuckoo in the Nest , passage=But Sophia's mother was not the woman to brook defiance. After a few moments' vain remonstrance her husband complied. His manner and appearance were suggestive of a satiated sea-lion.}}
  • * 2005 , Nicholas Ostler, Empires of the Word: A Language History of the World , Harper:
  • Nevertheless, Garcilaso does claim that the Spaniards ‘who were unable to brook the length of the discourse, had left their places and fallen on the Indians’.
    Derived terms
    *

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl), from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A body of running water smaller than a river; a small stream.
  • *Bible, (w) viii. 7
  • *:The Lord thy God bringeth thee into a good land, a land of brooks of water.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:empties itself, as doth an inland brook / into the main of waters
  • *
  • *:But then I had the [massive] flintlock by me for protection. ¶.
  • A water meadow.
  • Low, marshy ground.
  • Synonyms
    * beck * burn * coulee * creek * stream