Brag vs Brog - What's the difference?

brag | brog |


In lang=en terms the difference between brag and brog

is that brag is to boast of while brog is to prod with a pointed instrument, such as a lance; to prick or pierce.

As verbs the difference between brag and brog

is that brag is to boast; to talk with excessive pride about what one has, can do, or has done while brog is to prod with a pointed instrument, such as a lance; to prick or pierce.

As nouns the difference between brag and brog

is that brag is a boast or boasting; bragging; ostentatious pretence or self-glorification while brog is a pointed instrument, such as a joiner's awl.

As an adjective brag

is first-rate.

As an adverb brag

is (obsolete) proudly; boastfully.

brag

English

Verb

  • To boast; to talk with excessive pride about what one has, can do, or has done.
  • to brag of one's exploits, courage, or money
  • * Shakespeare
  • Conceit, more rich in matter than in words, / Brags of his substance, not of ornament.
  • To boast of.
  • *Shakespeare
  • Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade

    Synonyms

    * boast

    Derived terms

    * braggart * bragging rights * humblebrag

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A boast or boasting; bragging; ostentatious pretence or self-glorification.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Caesar made not here his brag / Of "came", and "saw", and "overcame".
  • The thing which is boasted of.
  • * Milton
  • Beauty is Nature's brag .
  • (by ellipsis) The card game three card brag.
  • (Chesterfield)

    Adjective

    (bragger)
  • First-rate.
  • (archaic) Brisk; full of spirits; boasting; pretentious; conceited.
  • * Ben Jonson
  • a brag young fellow

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • (obsolete) proudly; boastfully
  • (Fuller)

    References

    Anagrams

    * * ----

    brog

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A pointed instrument, such as a joiner's awl.
  • Verb

    (brogg)
  • To prod with a pointed instrument, such as a lance; to prick or pierce.
  • (Sir Walter Scott)
  • To broggle.
  • (Webster 1913)