Roached vs Broached - What's the difference?

roached | broached |


As an adjective roached

is having a style of trimming a horse's mane so that the hair stands straight up from the neck, similar to the natural growth pattern of a zebra's mane, or a mohawk haircut on a human.

As a verb broached is

(broach).

roached

English

Adjective

(-)
  • Having a style of trimming a horse's mane so that the hair stands straight up from the neck, similar to the natural growth pattern of a zebra's mane, or a mohawk haircut on a human.
  • broached

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (broach)

  • broach

    English

    Etymology 1

    (etyl) broche, from

    Noun

    (es)
  • A series of chisel points mounted on one piece of steel. (rfex)
  • (masonry) A broad chisel for stone-cutting.
  • A spit for cooking food.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • He turned a broach that had worn a crown.
  • An awl; a bodkin; also, a wooden rod or pin, sharpened at each end, used by thatchers.
  • (Forby)
  • (architecture, UK, dialect) A spire rising from a tower.
  • A spit-like start on the head of a young stag.
  • The stick from which candle wicks are suspended for dipping.
  • (Knight)
  • The pin in a lock which enters the barrel of the key.
  • Verb

    (es)
  • To make a hole in, especially a cask of liquor, and put in a tap in order to draw the liquid.
  • To open, to make an opening into; to pierce.
  • French knights at Agincourt were unable to broach the English line.
  • (senseid) (figuratively) To begin discussion about (something).
  • I broached the subject of contraceptives carefully when the teenager mentioned his promiscuity.
  • * 1913 ,
  • Yet he was much too much scared of broaching any man, let alone one in a peaked cap, to dare to ask.
  • * 1918 , (Edgar Rice Burroughs), Chapter VI
  • I have tried on several occasions to broach the subject of my love to Lys; but she will not listen.

    Etymology 2

    (en)

    Verb

    (es)
  • To be turned sideways to oncoming waves, especially large or breaking waves.
  • The small boat broached and nearly sank, because of the large waves.
  • To cause to turn sideways to oncoming waves, especially large or breaking waves.
  • To be overcome or submerged by a wave or surge of water.
  • Each time we came around into the wind, the sea broached our bow.