Brace vs Bracket - What's the difference?

brace | bracket |


In context|nautical|lang=en terms the difference between brace and bracket

is that brace is (nautical) to swing round the yards of a square rigged ship, using braces, to present a more efficient sail surface to the direction of the wind while bracket is (nautical) a short crooked timber, resembling a knee, used as a support.

As nouns the difference between brace and bracket

is that brace is (obsolete) armor for the arm; vambrace while bracket is (senseid)a fixture attached to a wall to hold up a shelf.

As verbs the difference between brace and bracket

is that brace is (intransitive) to prepare for something bad, as an impact or blow while bracket is to bound on both sides, to surround as enclosing with brackets.

brace

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • (obsolete) Armor for the arm; vambrace.
  • (obsolete) A measurement of length, originally representing a person's outstretched arms.
  • A curved instrument or handle of iron or wood, for holding and turning bits, etc.; a bitstock.
  • That which holds anything tightly or supports it firmly; a bandage or a prop.
  • A cord, ligament, or rod, for producing or maintaining tension.
  • A thong used to regulate the tension of a drum.
  • * Derham
  • The little bones of the ear drum do in straining and relaxing it as the braces of the war drum do in that.
  • The state of being braced or tight; tension.
  • * Holder
  • the laxness of the tympanum, when it has lost its brace or tension
  • Harness; warlike preparation.
  • * Shakespeare
  • for that it stands not in such warlike brace
  • (typography) A curved, pointed line, also known as "curly bracket": { or } connecting two or more words or lines, which are to be considered together, such as in ; in music, used to connect staves.
  • A pair, a couple; originally used of dogs, and later of animals generally and then other things, but rarely human persons. (The plural in this sense is unchanged.) In British use (as plural ), this is a particularly common reference to game birds.
  • * 1610 , , act 5 scene 1
  • But you, my brace of lords, were I so minded,
    I here could pluck his highness' frown upon you,
    And justify you traitors
  • * Addison
  • He is said to have shot fifty brace of pheasants.
  • * Fuller
  • A brace of brethren, both bishops, both eminent for learning and religion, now appeared in the church.
  • A piece of material used to transmit, or change the direction of, weight or pressure; any one of the pieces, in a frame or truss, which divide the structure into triangular parts. It may act as a tie, or as a strut, and serves to prevent distortion of the structure, and transverse strains in its members. A boiler brace is a diagonal stay, connecting the head with the shell.
  • (nautical) A rope reeved through a block at the end of a yard, by which the yard is moved horizontally; also, a rudder gudgeon.
  • (UK, Cornwall, mining) The mouth of a shaft.
  • (mostly, in the plural) Straps or bands to sustain trousers; suspenders.
  • (mostly, in the plural) A system of wires, brackets, and elastic bands used to correct crooked teeth or to reduce overbite.
  • (soccer) Two goals scored by one player in a game.
  • Verb

    (brac)
  • (intransitive) To prepare for something bad, as an impact or blow.
  • All hands, brace for impact!
    Brace yourself!
  • *
  • The boy has no idea about everything that's been going on. You need to brace him for what's about to happen.
  • To place in a position for resisting pressure; to hold firmly.
  • He braced himself against the crowd.
  • * Fairfax
  • A sturdy lance in his right hand he braced .
  • (nautical) To swing round the yards of a square rigged ship, using braces, to present a more efficient sail surface to the direction of the wind
  • to brace the yards
  • To stop someone for questioning, usually said of police.
  • To confront with questions, demands or requests.
  • To furnish with braces; to support; to prop.
  • to brace a beam in a building
  • To draw tight; to tighten; to put in a state of tension; to strain; to strengthen.
  • to brace the nerves
  • * Campbell
  • And welcome war to brace her drums.
  • To bind or tie closely; to fasten tightly.
  • * John Locke
  • The women of China, by bracing and binding them from their infancy, have very little feet.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • some who spurs had first braced on

    Anagrams

    * ----

    bracket

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (senseid)A fixture attached to a wall to hold up a shelf.
  • (engineering) Any intermediate object that connects a smaller part to a larger part, the smaller part typically projecting sideways from the larger part.
  • (nautical) A short crooked timber, resembling a knee, used as a support.
  • (military) The cheek or side of an ordnance carriage.
  • Any of the characters "(", ")", "[", "]", "{", "}", and, in the area of computer languages, "<" and ">".
  • "(" and ")" specifically, the other forms above requiring adjectives for disambiguation.
  • (technical) "[" and "]" specifically - opposed to the other forms of which have their own technical names.
  • (sports) Printed diagram of games in a tournament.
  • (sports) Prediction of the outcome of games in a tournament, used for betting purposes.
  • One of several ranges of numbers.
  • tax bracket''''', ''age '''bracket
  • (military) In artillery, the endangered region between two shell impacts (one long and one short). The next shell fired is likely to hit accurately.
  • Synonyms

    * parentheses, parens

    Derived terms

    * angle bracket * bracketology * bulge bracket * curly bracket * gas bracket * income bracket/income tax bracket/tax bracket * price bracket * round bracket * shelf bracket * square bracket

    Hyponyms

    * See also

    See also

    (punctuation)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To bound on both sides, to surround as enclosing with brackets.
  • I tried to hit the bullseye by first bracketing it with two shots and then splitting the difference with my third, but I missed.
  • To place in the same category.
  • Because the didn't have enough young boys for two full teams, they bracketed the seven-year olds with the eight-year olds.
  • To mark distinctly for special treatment.
  • *
  • To set aside, discount, ignore.
  • * 2009 , Michael Erard, “ Holy Grammar, Inc.”, in Search Magazine , July–August 2009:
  • SIL got access to academic legitimacy; linguists bracketed the evangelical engine that drives SIL because they got access to data and tools.
  • (photography) To take multiple images of the same subject, using a range of exposure settings, in order to help ensure that a satisfactory image is obtained.
  • (philosophy, phenomenology) In the philosophical system of and his followers, to set aside metaphysical theories and existential questions concerning what is real in order to focus philosophical attention simply on the actual content of experience.