Room vs Bower - What's the difference?

room | bower |


As a noun room

is joy, happiness.

As a proper noun bower is

.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

room

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) roum, rom, rum, from (etyl) .

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • (dialectal, or, obsolete) Wide; spacious; roomy.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) rome, from (etyl) .

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • (dialectal, or, obsolete) Far; at a distance; wide in space or extent.
  • (nautical) Off from the wind.
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl) roum, from (etyl) through Indo-European. More at (l). Apparently an exception to the , which otherwise would have produced the pronunciation , but /a?/ does not occur before noncoronal consonants in Modern English.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • * 1526 , (William Tyndale), trans. Bible , (w) I:
  • Thou lorde whiche knowest the hertes of all men, shewe whether thou hast chosen of these two, that the one maye take the roume of this ministracion, and apostleshippe from the which Judas by transgression fell, that he myght goo to his awne place.
  • * 1748 , (Samuel Richardson), (Clarissa) :
  • Nor shalt thou give me room to doubt whether it be necessity or love, that inspires this condescending impulse.
  • (label) Space for'' something, or ''to carry out an activity.
  • * 2010 , Jonathan Franklin, The Guardian , 27 Aug 2010:
  • He explains they have enough room to stand and lie down, points out the "little cup to brush our teeth", and the place where they pray.
  • (label) A particular portion of space.
  • * (rfdate) (Thomas Overbury) (c.1581-1613)
  • If he have but twelve pence in his purse, he will give it for the best room in a playhouse.
  • * (rfdate) Bible, (w) xiv. 8
  • When thou art bidden of any man to a wedding, sit not down in the highest room .
  • * (rfdate) (Joseph Addison) (1672-1719)
  • There was no prince in the empire who had room for such an alliance.
  • * 2010 , Roger Bootle, The Telegraph , 12 Sep 2010:
  • There are major disagreements within the Coalition and politicians always want to retain room for manoeuvre.
  • (label) A space between the timbers of a ship's frame.
  • (label) A separate part of a building, enclosed by walls, a floor and a ceiling.
  • * 1813 , (Jane Austen), (Pride and Prejudice) :
  • Miss Bingley made no answer, and soon afterwards she got up and walked about the room .
  • * , chapter=10
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=He looked round the poor room', at the distempered walls, and the bad engravings in meretricious frames, the crinkly paper and wax flowers on the chiffonier; and he thought of a '''room''' like Father Bryan's, with panelling, with cut glass, with tulips in silver pots, such a ' room as he had hoped to have for his own.}}
  • (label) With possessive pronoun: one's bedroom.
  • * , chapter=6
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=She was so mad she wouldn't speak to me for quite a spell, but at last I coaxed her into going up to Miss Emmeline's room and fetching down a tintype of the missing Deacon man.}}
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=20 citation , passage=‘No. I only opened the door a foot and put my head in. The street lamps shine into that room . I could see him. He was all right. Sleeping like a great grampus. Poor, poor chap.’}}
  • (label) A set of rooms inhabited by someone; one's lodgings.
  • (label) An area for working in a coal mine. (jump)
  • (label) A portion of a cave that is wider than a passage. (jump)
  • Place or position in society; office; rank; post, sometimes when vacated by its former occupant.
  • * (rfdate) Bible, (w) ii. 22
  • When he heard that Archelaus did reign in Judea in the room of his father Herod.
  • * (rfdate) (William Tyndale) (1494-1536)
  • Neither that I look for a higher room in heaven.
  • * (rfdate) (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • Let Bianca take her sister's room .
    Synonyms
    * (jump) elbow room, legroom, space * (jump) chamber, quarters * (jump) chamber * See also
    Derived terms
    * art room * AV room * backroom * ballroom * bathroom * bedroom * billiards room * blue room * boardroom * boiler room * box-room * break room * changing room * chat room * classroom * clean my room * cold room * common room * computer room * control room * copy room * courtroom * cutting room * darkroom * delivery room * dining room * discussion room * display room * dormroom * dressing room * elbow room * elephant in the room * embalming room * emergency room * engine room * examination room * fitting room * Florida room * front room * game room * get a room * giftwrapping room * green room * guest room * headroom * inner room * in the room * lamp room * laundry room * legroom * living room * locker room * lunchroom * map room * meditation room * meeting room * mud room * music room * need a room * newsroom * no room at the inn * operating room * padded room * panic room * plant room * play room * pool room * powder room * prep room * press room * private room * pump room * reading room * ready room * recording room * reptile room * romper room * room and board * room at the top * room for abuse * room for apology * room for dessert * room for error * room for improvement * room service * room to breathe * room to grow * room to roam * room with a view * roommate * roomie * roomy * rubber room * rumpus room * save room * school room * science room * screening room * sewing room * showroom * sitting room * sound room * spare room * standing room only * steam room * storeroom * strong room * study room * sunroom * the other room * the upper room * upstairs room * viewing room * waiting room * war room * washroom * weightroom * wiggle room * work the room * workroom

    Verb

  • To reside, especially as a boarder or tenant.
  • Doctor Watson roomed with Sherlock Holmes at Baker Street.
    Derived terms
    * roomer * room together * roomy

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * * 1000 English basic words ----

    bower

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) ).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A bedroom or private apartments, especially for a woman in a medieval castle.
  • * Gascoigne
  • Give me my lute in bed now as I lie, / And lock the doors of mine unlucky bower .
  • (literary) A dwelling; a picturesque country cottage, especially one that is used as a retreat.
  • (Shenstone)
  • A shady, leafy shelter or recess in a garden or woods.
  • * 1599 ,
  • say that thou overheard'st us,
    And bid her steal into the pleached bower ,
    Where honey-suckles, ripen'd by the sun,
    Forbid the sun to enter;
  • * {{quote-book, year=1907, author=
  • , title=The Dust of Conflict , chapter=1 citation , passage=
  • (ornithology) A large structure made of grass and bright objects, used by the bower bird during courtship displays.
  • Synonyms
    *

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To embower; to enclose.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (obsolete) To lodge.
  • (Spenser)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) boueer, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A peasant; a farmer.
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl) Bauer.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Either of the two highest trumps in euchre.
  • Derived terms
    * best bower * left bower * right bower

    Etymology 4

    From the bow of a ship

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (nautical) A type of ship's anchor, carried at the bow.
  • One who bows or bends.
  • A muscle that bends a limb, especially the arm.
  • * Spenser
  • His rawbone arms, whose mighty brawned bowers / Were wont to rive steel plates and helmets hew.

    Etymology 5

    From bough, compare brancher.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete, falconry) A young hawk, when it begins to leave the nest.
  • (Webster 1913)