Bower vs Fan - What's the difference?

bower | fan |


As nouns the difference between bower and fan

is that bower is a bedroom or private apartments, especially for a woman in a medieval castle or bower can be a peasant; a farmer or bower can be either of the two highest trumps in euchre or bower can be (nautical) a type of ship's anchor, carried at the bow or bower can be (obsolete|falconry) a young hawk, when it begins to leave the nest while fan is a hand-held device consisting of concertinaed material, or slats of material, gathered together at one end, that may be opened out into the shape of a sector of a circle and waved back and forth in order to move air towards oneself and cool oneself or fan can be an admirer or aficionado, especially of a sport or performer; someone who is fond of something or someone; an admirer.

As verbs the difference between bower and fan

is that bower is to embower; to enclose while fan is to blow air on (something) by means of a fan (hand-held, mechanical or electrical) or otherwise.

bower

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) ).

Noun

(en noun)
  • A bedroom or private apartments, especially for a woman in a medieval castle.
  • * Gascoigne
  • Give me my lute in bed now as I lie, / And lock the doors of mine unlucky bower .
  • (literary) A dwelling; a picturesque country cottage, especially one that is used as a retreat.
  • (Shenstone)
  • A shady, leafy shelter or recess in a garden or woods.
  • * 1599 ,
  • say that thou overheard'st us,
    And bid her steal into the pleached bower ,
    Where honey-suckles, ripen'd by the sun,
    Forbid the sun to enter;
  • * {{quote-book, year=1907, author=
  • , title=The Dust of Conflict , chapter=1 citation , passage=
  • (ornithology) A large structure made of grass and bright objects, used by the bower bird during courtship displays.
  • Synonyms
    *

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To embower; to enclose.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (obsolete) To lodge.
  • (Spenser)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) boueer, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A peasant; a farmer.
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl) Bauer.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Either of the two highest trumps in euchre.
  • Derived terms
    * best bower * left bower * right bower

    Etymology 4

    From the bow of a ship

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (nautical) A type of ship's anchor, carried at the bow.
  • One who bows or bends.
  • A muscle that bends a limb, especially the arm.
  • * Spenser
  • His rawbone arms, whose mighty brawned bowers / Were wont to rive steel plates and helmets hew.

    Etymology 5

    From bough, compare brancher.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete, falconry) A young hawk, when it begins to leave the nest.
  • (Webster 1913)

    fan

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl), from (etyl) . More at (l).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A hand-held device consisting of concertinaed material, or slats of material, gathered together at one end, that may be opened out into the shape of a sector of a circle and waved back and forth in order to move air towards oneself and cool oneself.
  • An electrical device for moving air, used for cooling people, machinery, etc.
  • Anything resembling a hand-held fan in shape, e.g., a peacock‚Äôs tail.
  • An instrument for winnowing grain, by moving which the grain is tossed and agitated, and the chaff is separated and blown away.
  • * :
  • The oxen likewise and the young asses that ear the ground shall eat clean provender, which hath been winnowed with the shovel and with the fan .
  • * :
  • Whose fan is in his hand, and he will throughly purge his floor, and gather his wheat into the garner; but he will burn up the chaff with unquenchable fire.
  • A small vane or sail, used to keep the large sails of a smock windmill always in the direction of the wind.
  • Derived terms
    * ceiling fan * cooling fan * desk fan * exhaust fan * extractor fan * fan belt * fan dance * fan death * hit the fan * pedestal fan * wall fan

    Verb

    (fann)
  • To blow air on (something) by means of a fan (hand-held, mechanical or electrical) or otherwise.
  • We enjoyed standing at the edge of the cliff, being fanned by the wind. .
  • * 1865 , (Lewis Carroll), (w, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland)
  • Alice took up the fan and gloves, and, as the hall was very hot, she kept fanning herself all the time she went on talking.
  • To slap (a behind, especially).
  • * 1934 , edition, ISBN 0553278193, page 148:
  • *
  • To move or spread in multiple directions from one point, in the shape of a hand-held fan.
  • Derived terms
    * fanner

    Etymology 2

    Shortened from (fanatic).

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • An admirer or aficionado, especially of a sport or performer; someone who is fond of something or someone; an admirer.
  • I am a big fan of libraries.

    See also

    * fanne

    Anagrams

    * * ----