Burrow vs Bore - What's the difference?

burrow | bore |


As nouns the difference between burrow and bore

is that burrow is a tunnel or hole, often as dug by a small creature while bore is farmer.

As a verb burrow

is to dig a tunnel or hole.

burrow

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A tunnel or hole, often as dug by a small creature.
  • * 1922 , (Margery Williams), (The Velveteen Rabbit)
  • But very soon he grew to like it, for the Boy used to talk to him, and made nice tunnels' for him under the bedclothes that he said were like the ' burrows the real rabbits lived in.
  • (mining) A heap or heaps of rubbish or refuse.
  • A mound.
  • An incorporated town.
  • (Webster 1913)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To dig a tunnel or hole.
  • bore

    English

    (wikipedia bore)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) . Sense of wearying may come from a figurative use such as "to bore the ears"; confer German drillen.

    Verb

    (bor)
  • (senseid)To inspire boredom in somebody.
  • * Shakespeare
  • He bores me with some trick.
  • * Carlyle
  • used to come and bore me at rare intervals.
  • (senseid)To make a hole through something.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I'll believe as soon this whole earth may be bored .
  • To make a hole with, or as if with, a boring instrument; to cut a circular hole by the rotary motion of a tool.
  • to bore for water or oil
    An insect bores into a tree.
  • To form or enlarge (something) by means of a boring instrument or apparatus.
  • to bore''' a steam cylinder or a gun barrel; to '''bore a hole
  • * T. W. Harris
  • short but very powerful jaws, by means whereof the insect can bore a cylindrical passage through the most solid wood
  • To make (a passage) by laborious effort, as in boring; to force a narrow and difficult passage through.
  • to bore one's way through a crowd
  • * John Gay
  • What bustling crowds I bored .
  • To be pierced or penetrated by an instrument that cuts as it turns.
  • This timber does not bore well.
  • To push forward in a certain direction with laborious effort.
  • * Dryden
  • They take their flight boring to the west.
  • (of a horse) To shoot out the nose or toss it in the air.
  • (Crabb)
  • (obsolete) To fool; to trick.
  • * Beaumont and Fletcher
  • I am abused, betrayed; I am laughed at, scorned, / Baffled and bored , it seems.
    Antonyms
    * interest
    Synonyms
    * See

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A hole drilled or milled through something.
  • the bore of a cannon
  • * Francis Bacon
  • the bores of wind instruments
  • The tunnel inside of a gun's barrel through which the bullet travels when fired.
  • A tool, such as an auger, for making a hole by boring.
  • A capped well drilled to tap artesian water. The place where the well exists.
  • One who inspires boredom or lack of interest.
  • Something that wearies by prolixity or dullness; a tiresome affair.
  • * Hawthorne
  • It is as great a bore as to hear a poet read his own verses.
  • Calibre; importance.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Yet are they much too light for the bore of the matter.
    Synonyms
    * See also

    Etymology 2

    Compare Icelandic word for "wave".

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sudden and rapid flow of tide in certain rivers and estuaries which rolls up as a wave; an eagre.
  • Etymology 3

    Verb

    (head)
  • (bear)