Boil vs Parch - What's the difference?

boil | parch |


As nouns the difference between boil and parch

is that boil is a localized accumulation of pus in the skin, resulting from infection or boil can be the point at which fluid begins to change to a vapour while parch is the condition of being parched.

As verbs the difference between boil and parch

is that boil is to heat (a liquid) to the point where it begins to turn into a gas while parch is to burn the surface of, to scorch.

boil

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) bile, .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A localized accumulation of pus in the skin, resulting from infection.
  • Synonyms
    * abscess * carbuncle * cyst * furuncle * pimple * pustule

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) "to well up, boil"). More at seethe, well.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The point at which fluid begins to change to a vapour.
  • Add the noodles when the water comes to the boil .
  • A dish of boiled food, especially based on seafood.
  • (rare, nonstandard) The collective noun for a group of hawks.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To heat (a liquid) to the point where it begins to turn into a gas.
  • Boil some water in a pan.
  • (intransitive) To cook in boiling water.
  • Boil the eggs for two minutes.
    Is the rice boiling yet?
  • Of a liquid, to begin to turn into a gas, seethe.
  • Pure water boils at 100 degrees Celsius.
  • (intransitive, informal, used only in progressive tenses) Said of weather being uncomfortably hot.
  • It’s boiling outside!
  • (intransitive, informal, used only in progressive tenses) To feel uncomfortably hot. See also seethe.
  • I’m boiling in here – could you open the window?
  • To form, or separate, by boiling or evaporation.
  • to boil sugar or salt
  • (obsolete) To steep or soak in warm water.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • To try whether seeds be old or new, the sense cannot inform; but if you boil them in water, the new seeds will sprout sooner.
  • To be agitated like boiling water; to bubble; to effervesce.
  • the boiling waves of the sea
  • * Bible, Job xii. 31
  • He maketh the deep to boil like a pot.
  • To be moved or excited with passion; to be hot or fervid.
  • His blood boils with anger.
  • * Surrey
  • Then boiled my breast with flame and burning wrath.
    Synonyms
    * (of a liquid) seethe, well, plaw ; see also * (of the weather) be baking]], be scorching, [[swelter, be sweltering * (of a person) be seething]], be baking, [[stew, be stewing
    Antonyms
    * (of a liquid) condense * (of the weather) be freezing * (of a person) be freezing
    Derived terms
    * boil away * boil down * boil down to * boil off * boil over * go off the boil * hard-boiled * make someone's blood boil * parboil * pot boiler * slow boil * soft-boiled
    See also
    * bake * condense * freeze * fry * grill * poach * steam

    parch

    English

    Verb

  • To burn the surface of, to scorch.
  • The sun today could parch cement.
  • To roast, as dry grain.
  • * Bible, Leviticus xxiii. 14
  • Ye shall eat neither bread, nor parched corn.
  • To dry to extremity; to shrivel with heat.
  • The patient's mouth is parched from fever.
  • (colloquial) To make thirsty.
  • We're parched , hon. Could you send up an ale from the cooler?
  • (archaic) To boil something slowly (Still used in Lancashire in , a type of mushy peas ).
  • To become superficially burnt; be become sunburned.
  • The locals watched, amused, as the tourists parched in the sun, having neglected to apply sunscreen or bring water.

    Noun

    (parches)
  • The condition of being parched.
  • * 1982 , (TC Boyle), Water Music , Penguin 2006, p. 64:
  • Yet here he is, not at the head, but somewhere toward the rear of the serpentine queue wending its way through all this parch […].
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