Why vs Boast - What's the difference?

why | boast |


As nouns the difference between why and boast

is that why is reason or why can be (uk|dialect) a young heifer while boast is a brag, a loud positive appraisal of oneself.

As an adverb why

is for what cause, reason, or purpose.

As an interjection why

is an exclamation used to express indignation, mild surprise, or impatience "well, i'll tell you".

As a verb boast is

to brag; to talk loudly in praise of oneself or boast can be (masonry) to dress, as a stone, with a broad chisel.

why

English

(wikipedia why)

Etymology 1

From (etyl), from (etyl) . See (l).

Adverb

(-)
  • For what cause, reason, or purpose.
  • #
  • Why is the sky blue?
  • Why did you do that?
  • I don’t know why he did that
  • Tell me why the moon changes phase.
  • #
  • Why spend money on something you already get for free?
  • Why not tell him how you feel?
  • #
  • Why''' him? '''Why not someone taller?
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Welcome to the plastisphere , passage=Plastics are energy-rich substances, which is why many of them burn so readily. Any organism that could unlock and use that energy would do well in the Anthropocene. Terrestrial bacteria and fungi which can manage this trick are already familiar to experts in the field.}}
    Synonyms
    * how come, wherefore

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • reason
  • A good article will cover the who, the what, the when, the where, the why and the how .
    Synonyms
    * wherefore

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • An exclamation used to express indignation, mild surprise, or impatience. "Well, I'll tell you...".
  • * Daniel Defoe
  • Why , child, I tell thee if I was thy mother I would not disown thee; don't you see I am as kind to you as if I was your mother?”
    Derived terms
    * whyever * why in God's name * why not * why on Earth * whys and wherefores * why the Devil * why the dickens * why the fuck

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    (whies)
  • (UK, dialect) A young heifer.
  • (Grose)

    Statistics

    *

    boast

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) boosten, bosten, from .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A brag, a loud positive appraisal of oneself.
  • (squash) A shot where the ball is driven off a side wall and then strikes the front wall.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To brag; to talk loudly in praise of oneself.
  • * 2005 , (Plato), Sophist . Translation by Lesley Brown. .
  • On no account will he or any other kind be able to boast that he's escaped the pursuit of those who can follow so detailed and comprehensive a method of enquiry.
  • To speak of with pride, vanity, or exultation, with a view to self-commendation; to extol.
  • * (John Milton)
  • Lest bad men should boast / Their specious deeds.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-21, author=(Oliver Burkeman)
  • , volume=189, issue=2, page=27, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= The tao of tech , passage=The dirty secret of the internet is that all this distraction and interruption is immensely profitable. Web companies like to boast about "creating compelling content", or offering services that let you "stay up to date with what your friends are doing",
  • (obsolete) To speak in exulting language of another; to glory; to exult.
  • * Bible, Psalms xiiv. 8
  • In God we boast all the day long.
  • (squash) To play a .
  • (ergative) To possess something special.
  • Synonyms
    * brag
    Derived terms
    * boastful * boastfully * outboast

    Etymology 2

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (masonry) To dress, as a stone, with a broad chisel.
  • (Weale)
  • (sculpting) To shape roughly as a preparation for the finer work to follow; to cut to the general form required.