Bludgeoner vs Bludgeon - What's the difference?

bludgeoner | bludgeon |

Bludgeoner is a derived term of bludgeon.


As nouns the difference between bludgeoner and bludgeon

is that bludgeoner is one who bludgeons while bludgeon is a short, heavy club, often of wood, which is thicker or loaded at one end.

As a verb bludgeon is

to strike or hit with something hard, usually on the head; to club.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

bludgeoner

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • One who bludgeons.
  • * 2007 , '', October 27 Puppy-Killer Gets 9 Months in Cage
  • An unemployed, coke-abusing dog-bludgeoner was sentenced yesterday to nine months in prison by a Manhattan Supreme Court judge who called the man's 2005 murder of his pet "unimaginable."
  • * 1898 , Francis Fisher Browne, Waldo Ralph Browne - The Dial: A Semi-monthly Journal of Literary Criticism, Discussion, and Information page 8
  • If one is stopped on the highway, one would rather hand one's purse over to a courteous knight than to the rough-and-ready bludgeoner .

    bludgeon

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A short, heavy club, often of wood, which is thicker or loaded at one end.
  • We smashed the radio with a steel bludgeon .

    See also

    * truncheon

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To strike or hit with something hard, usually on the head; to club.
  • The apprehended rioter was bludgeoned to death.
  • To coerce someone, as if with a bludgeon.
  • Their favorite method was bludgeoning us with the same old arguments in favor of their opinions.

    Synonyms

    * (to club) cudgel * (coerce) harrass, pummel

    Derived terms

    * bludgeoner

    References

    *