Worst vs Bitter - What's the difference?

worst | bitter |


As adjectives the difference between worst and bitter

is that worst is (bad) while bitter is having an acrid taste (usually from a basic substance).

As nouns the difference between worst and bitter

is that worst is something or someone that is the worst while bitter is (usually in the plural bitters) a liquid or powder, made from bitter herbs, used in mixed drinks or as a tonic.

As verbs the difference between worst and bitter

is that worst is (archaic|transitive) to make worse while bitter is to make bitter.

As an adverb worst

is in the worst way: most badly, most ill.

worst

English

Adjective

(head)
  • (bad)
  • # Most inferior; doing the least good.
  • I think putting oil on a burn is the worst thing you can do.
  • # Most unfavorable.
  • That's the worst news I've had all day.
  • # Most harmful or severe.
  • The worst storm we had last winter knocked down our power lines.
  • # Most ill.
  • I'm feeling really ill — the worst I've felt all week.
  • # (Used with the definite article and an implied noun): something that is worst.
  • None of these photographs of me are good, but this one is definitely the worst .
  • Synonyms

    * (most ill) (nonstandard)

    Antonyms

    * best

    Derived terms

    * worstness * fear the worst * turn for the worst

    Noun

    (head)
  • something or someone that is the worst
  • (Something that is worst) * French: * Khmer: * Polish: (trans-mid) * Portuguese: (trans-bottom)

    Adverb

    (head)
  • In the worst way: most badly, most ill.
  • My sore leg hurts worst when it's cold and rainy.
    This is the worst -written essay I've ever seen.
    She's the worst -informed of the lot.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (archaic) To make worse.
  • (dated) To grow worse; to deteriorate.
  • * (rfdate) Jane Austen:
  • Anne haggard, Mary coarse, every face in the neighbourhood worsting .
  • (rare) To outdo or defeat, especially in battle.
  • * South
  • The Philistines were worsted by the captivated ark.

    Anagrams

    * 1000 English basic words ----

    bitter

    English

    Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • Having an acrid taste (usually from a basic substance).
  • :
  • *
  • *:Long after his cigar burnt bitter , he sat with eyes fixed on the blaze. When the flames at last began to flicker and subside, his lids fluttered, then drooped?; but he had lost all reckoning of time when he opened them again to find Miss Erroll in furs and ball-gown kneeling on the hearth.
  • Harsh, piercing or stinging.
  • :
  • *1999 , (Neil Gaiman), Stardust , p.31 (Perennial paperback edition)
  • *:It was at the end of February,.
  • Hateful or hostile.
  • :
  • *(Bible), (w) iii. 19
  • *:Husbands, love your wives, and be not bitter against them.
  • Cynical and resentful.
  • :
  • Usage notes

    * The one-word comparative form (bitterer) and superlative form (bitterest) exist, but are less common than their two-word counterparts (term) and (term).

    Derived terms

    * bitter pill to swallow

    See also

    * bitter end

    Antonyms

    * (cynical and resentful) optimistic

    Synonyms

    * (cynical and resentful) jaded

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (usually in the plural bitters) A liquid or powder, made from bitter herbs, used in mixed drinks or as a tonic.
  • * 1773 , Oliver Goldsmith,
  • Thus I begin: "All is not gold that glitters,
    "Pleasure seems sweet, but proves a glass of bitters .
  • A type of beer heavily flavored with hops.
  • (nautical) A turn of a cable about the bitts.
  • Derived terms

    * brought up to a bitter

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make bitter.
  • (Wolcott)
    ----