Billed vs Billet - What's the difference?

billed | billet |


As a verb billed

is (bill).

As an adjective billed

is having a specified kind of bill (beak or beak-like projection).

As a noun billet is

ticket.

billed

English

Verb

(head)
  • (bill)
  • Adjective

    (-)
  • Having a specified kind of bill (beak or beak-like projection).
  • Derived terms

    * duckbilled

    billet

    English

    (wikipedia billet)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) bylet, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A short informal letter.
  • *
  • However, when his cool reflections returned, he plainly perceived that his case was neither mended nor altered by Sophia's billet
  • A written order to quarter soldiers.
  • Etymology 2

    (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A place where a soldier is assigned to lodge.
  • * , chapter=19
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Nothing was too small to receive attention, if a supervising eye could suggest improvements likely to conduce to the common welfare. Mr. Gordon Burnage, for instance, personally visited dust-bins and back premises, accompanied by a sort of village bailiff, going his round like a commanding officer doing billets .}}
  • * 1997 : Chris Horrocks, Introducing Foucault , page 9 (Totem Books, Icon Books; ISBN 1840460865)
  • 17 June 1940': Prime Minister Pétain requests armistice. Germans use the Foucaults’ holiday home as officers’ ' billet . Foucault steals firewood for school from collaborationist militia. Foucault does well at school, but messes up his summer exams in 1940.
  • An allocated space or berth in a boat or ship.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=10 , passage=The skipper Mr. Cooke had hired at Far Harbor was a God-fearing man with a luke warm interest in his new billet and employer, and had only been prevailed upon to take charge of the yacht after the offer of an emolument equal to half a year's sea pay of an ensign in the navy.}}

    Verb

  • To lodge soldiers, usually by order.
  • * (Washington Irving) (1783-1859)
  • Billeted in so antiquated a mansion.
  • To lodge, or be quartered, in a private house.
  • (label) To direct, by a ticket or note, where to lodge.
  • Etymology 3

    (etyl) billette, from ).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • metallurgy a semi-finished length of metal
  • a short piece of wood, especially one used as firewood
  • * Shakespeare
  • They shall beat out my brains with billets .
  • (heraldiccharge) A rectangle used as a charge on an escutcheon
  • (architecture) An ornament in Norman work, resembling a billet of wood either square or round.
  • (saddlery) A strap which enters a buckle.
  • A loop which receives the end of a buckled strap.
  • (Knight)