Bib vs Biblike - What's the difference?

bib | biblike |


As a noun bib

is an item of clothing for babies tied around their neck to protect their clothes from getting dirty when eating.

As a verb bib

is (archaic) to drink heartily; to tipple.

As an adjective biblike is

resembling a bib or some aspect of one.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

bib

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • An item of clothing for babies tied around their neck to protect their clothes from getting dirty when eating.
  • A rectangular piece of material, carrying a bib number, worn as identification by entrants in a race
  • The upper part of an apron or overalls.
  • A patch of colour around an animal's upper breast and throat.
  • * 1950 , Arthur Cleveland Bent, Life Histories of North American Wagtails, Shrikes, Vireos, and their Allies
  • In summer the whole throat and breast are black, but in winter plumage the throat is white bounded by a horseshoe-shaped black bib .
  • * 2011 , Arthur Peacock, Gettysburg the Cat (page 22)
  • He don't look anything like the captain. This here cat has got a nice thick black coat of fur with a nice white bib and white feet.
  • An arctic fish (Gadus luscus ), allied to the cod; the pout.
  • A bibcock.
  • Derived terms

    * best bib and tucker

    Verb

    (bibb)
  • (archaic) To drink heartily; to tipple.
  • He was constantly bibbing . — Locke.

    References

    English palindromes ----

    biblike

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Resembling a bib or some aspect of one.