Endest vs Bendest - What's the difference?

endest | bendest |


As verbs the difference between endest and bendest

is that endest is (end) while bendest is (bend).

endest

English

Verb

(head)
  • (end)
  • ----

    end

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (rfc-sense) The final point of something in space or time.
  • * 1908: (Kenneth Grahame), (The Wind in the Willows)
  • they followed him... into a sort of a central hall; out of which they could dimly see other long tunnel-like passages branching, passages mysterious and without apparent end .
  • * , chapter=4
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=I told him about everything I could think of; and what I couldn't think of he did. He asked about six questions during my yarn, but every question had a point to it. At the end he bowed and thanked me once more. As a thanker he was main-truck high; I never see anybody so polite.}}
  • The cessation of an effort, activity, state, or motion.
  • Is there no end to this madness?
  • Death, especially miserable.
  • He met a terrible end in the jungle.
    I hope the end comes quickly.
  • * (rfdate) Shakespeare
  • Confound your hidden falsehood, and award / Either of you to be the other's end .
  • * (rfdate) Alexander Pope
  • unblamed through life, lamented in thy end
  • Result.
  • * (rfdate) Shakespeare
  • O that a man might know / The end of this day's business ere it come!
  • A purpose, goal, or aim.
  • * (rfdate) Dryden
  • Losing her, the end of living lose.
  • * (rfdate) Coleridge
  • When every man is his own end , all things will come to a bad end.
  • * 1946 , (Bertrand Russell), History of Western Philosophy , I.21:
  • There is a long argument to prove that foreign conquest is not the end of the State, showing that many people took the imperialist view.
  • (cricket) One of the two parts of the ground used as a descriptive name for half of the ground.
  • (American football) The position at the end of either the offensive or defensive line, a tight end, a split end, a defensive end.
  • * 1926 , , (The Great Gatsby) , Penguin 2000, p. 11:
  • Her husband, among various physical accomplishments, had been one of the most powerful ends that ever played football at New Haven [...].
  • (curling) A period of play in which each team throws eight rocks, two per player, in alternating fashion.
  • (mathematics) An ideal point of a graph or other complex.
  • That which is left; a remnant; a fragment; a scrap.
  • odds and ends
  • * (rfdate) Shakespeare
  • I clothe my naked villainy / With old odd ends stolen out of holy writ, / And seem a saint, when most I play the devil.
  • One of the yarns of the worsted warp in a Brussels carpet.
  • Usage notes

    * Adjectives often used with "end": final, ultimate, deep, happy, etc.

    Synonyms

    * (final point in space or time) conclusion, limit, terminus, termination * See also

    Antonyms

    * (final point of something) beginning, start

    Derived terms

    * at the end of the day * big end * bitter end * dead-end * East End * -ended * endless * endlike * endly * End of Days * end of the line * end of the road * endpaper * end piece, endpiece * end product * endsay * end times * end-to-end * endward * endways, endwise * high-end * know which end is up * living end * loose end * low-end * make ends meet * off the deep end * on end * rear end * short end of the stick * split end * The End * tight end * to this end * up-end * West End * week-end, weekend * without end

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (ergative) To finish, terminate.
  • * Bible, (w) ii. 2
  • On the seventh day God ended his work.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • I shall end this strife.
  • * 1896 , , (A Shropshire Lad), XLV, lines 7-8:
  • But play the man, stand up and end you
    When your sickness is your soul.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-11-09, volume=409, issue=8861, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= How to stop the fighting, sometimes , passage=Ending civil wars is hard. Hatreds within countries often run far deeper than between them. The fighting rarely sticks to battlefields, as it can do between states. Civilians are rarely spared. And there are no borders to fall back behind.}}

    Derived terms

    * ending * end up * never-ending * unending

    Statistics

    *

    bendest

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (bend)
  • Anagrams

    *

    bend

    English

    Verb

  • To cause (something) to change its shape into a curve, by physical force, chemical action, or any other means.
  • If you bend the pipe too far, it will break.
    Don’t bend your knees.
  • To become curved.
  • Look at the trees bending in the wind.
  • To cause to change direction.
  • * Milton
  • Bend thine ear to supplication.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Towards Coventry bend we our course.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • bending her eyes upon her parent
  • To change direction.
  • The road bends to the right
  • To be inclined; to direct itself.
  • * Milton
  • to whom our vows and wishes bend
  • To stoop.
  • He bent down to pick up the pieces.
  • To bow in prayer, or in token of submission.
  • * Coleridge
  • Each to his great Father bends .
  • To force to submit.
  • They bent me to their will.
  • * Shakespeare
  • except she bend her humour
  • To submit.
  • I am bending to my desire to eat junk food.
  • To apply to a task or purpose.
  • He bent the company's resources to gaining market share.
  • * Temple
  • to bend his mind to any public business
  • * Alexander Pope
  • when to mischief mortals bend their will
  • To apply oneself to a task or purpose.
  • He bent to the goal of gaining market share.
  • To adapt or interpret to for a purpose or beneficiary.
  • (nautical) To tie, as in securing a line to a cleat; to shackle a chain to an anchor; make fast.
  • Bend the sail to the yard.
  • (music) To smoothly change the pitch of a note.
  • You should bend the G slightly sharp in the next measure.
  • (nautical) To swing the body when rowing.
  • Derived terms

    * bend down * bend over * bend over backwards * bend somebody's ear * on bended knee * bend one's elbow * bend out of shape * bend the truth

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A curve.
  • * 1968 , (Johnny Cash),
  • I hear the train a comin'/It's rolling round the bend
  • * , chapter=1
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients, chapter=1 , passage=I stumbled along through the young pines and huckleberry bushes. Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path that, I cal'lated, might lead to the road I was hunting for. It twisted and turned, and, the first thing I knew, made a sudden bend around a bunch of bayberry scrub and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn.}}
  • (nautical) Any of the various knots which join the ends of two lines.
  • (Totten)
  • A severe condition caused by excessively quick decompression, causing bubbles of nitrogen to form in the blood; decompression sickness.
  • (heraldiccharge) One of the honourable ordinaries formed by two diagonal lines drawn from the dexter chief to the sinister base; it generally occupies a fifth part of the shield if uncharged, but if charged one third.
  • (obsolete) Turn; purpose; inclination; ends.
  • * Fletcher
  • Farewell, poor swain; thou art not for my bend .
  • In the leather trade, the best quality of sole leather; a butt.
  • (mining) Hard, indurated clay; bind.
  • (nautical, in the plural) The thickest and strongest planks in a ship's sides, more generally called wales, which have the beams, knees, and futtocks bolted to them.
  • (nautical, in the plural) The frames or ribs that form the ship's body from the keel to the top of the sides.
  • the midship bends

    Derived terms

    * around the bend * bend sinister * bendlet * bendsome * bendy * drive somebody round the bend * in bend * sheet bend * string bend

    References

    *