Nag vs Beg - What's the difference?

nag | beg |


As nouns the difference between nag and beg

is that nag is a small horse; a pony or nag can be one who while beg is .

As a verb nag

is to repeatedly remind or complain to someone in an annoying way, often about insignificant matters.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

nag

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) nagge'', cognate with Dutch ''negge

Noun

(en noun)
  • A small horse; a pony.
  • An old useless horse.
  • (obsolete, derogatory) A paramour.
  • * 1598 , , III. x. 11:
  • Yon ribaudred nag of Egypt – Whom leprosy o'ertake!
    Synonyms
    * (old useless horse) dobbin, hack, jade, plug
    Coordinate terms
    * (old useless horse) bum (racing )

    Etymology 2

    Probably from a (etyl) source; compare Swedish .

    Verb

    (nagg)
  • To repeatedly remind or complain to someone in an annoying way, often about insignificant matters.
  • To act inappropriately in the eyes of peers, to backstab, to verbally abuse.
  • To bother with persistent memories.
  • The notion that he forgot something nagged him the rest of the day.
  • Other sorts of persistent annoyance, e.g.:
  • A nagging pain in his left knee
    A nagging north wind

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One who .
  • Anagrams

    * * * * ----

    beg

    English

    (wikipedia beg)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), assimilation from (etyl) *.

    Verb

    (begg)
  • to request the help of someone, often in the form of money
  • He begged on the street corner from passers-by.
  • to plead with someone for help, a favor, etc.; to entreat
  • I beg your pardon. I didn't mean to cause offence.
    He begged her to go to the prom with him .
  • * Shakespeare
  • I do beg your good will in this case.
  • * Bible, Matthew xxvii. 58
  • [Joseph] begged the body of Jesus.
  • * 1898 , , (Moonfleet) Chapter 5
  • But that same day came Sam Tewkesbury to the Why Not? about nightfall, and begged a glass of rum, being, as he said, 'all of a shake'
  • to assume, in the phrase (beg the question)
  • (proscribed) to raise a question, in the phrase (beg the question)
  • (legal, obsolete) To ask to be appointed guardian for, or to ask to have a guardian appointed for.
  • * Harrington
  • Else some will beg thee, in the court of wards.
    Usage notes
    * This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive . See
    Antonyms
    * (raise a question)
    Derived terms
    * beg the question * go begging * beg to differ

    See also

    *

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • a provincial governor under the Ottoman Empire, a bey
  • Etymology 3