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Fecked vs Becked - What's the difference?

fecked | becked |

As verbs the difference between fecked and becked

is that fecked is past tense of feck while becked is past tense of beck.

fecked

English

Verb

(head)
  • (feck)

  • feck

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl), aphetic form of (effect).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Effect, value; vigor.
  • *1996 , (David Foster Wallace), Infinite Jest , Abacus 2013, p. 64:
  • *:some of which have earned a small academic following for their technical feck and for a pathos that was somehow both surreally abstract and CNS-rendingly melodramatic at the same time.
  • Derived terms
    * feckless

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (Ireland, slang) To throw.
  • (Ireland, slang) To steal.
  • (Ireland, slang) To leave hastily.
  • Etymology 3

    Alteration of (fuck)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (euphemistic, chiefly, Irish) Fuck (except literally).
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • becked

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (beck)

  • beck

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) . Cognate with low German bek or beck

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Norfolk, Northern English dialect) A stream or small river.
  • * Drayton
  • The brooks, the becks , the rills.
    Synonyms
    * brook * burn * creek * stream

    Etymology 2

    A shortened form of (beckon), from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A significant nod, or motion of the head or hand, especially as a call or command.
  • To be at the beck and call of someone.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (archaic) To nod or motion with the head.
  • * Shakespeare
  • When gold and silver becks me to come on.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1896, author=Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr, title=Winter Evening Tales, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage="I'll buy so many acres of old Scotland and call them by the Lockerby's name; and I'll have nobles and great men come bowing and becking to David Lockerby as they do to Alexander Gordon. }}
  • *{{quote-book, year=1881, author=Various, title=The Best of the World's Classics, Vol. V (of X) - Great Britain and Ireland III, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=The becking waiter, that with wreathed smiles, wont to spread for Samuel and Bozzy their "supper of the gods," has long since pocketed his last sixpence; and vanished, sixpence and all, like a ghost at cock-crowing. }}

    Etymology 3

    See back.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A vat.
  • Etymology 4

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Spenser)