Beat vs Pant - What's the difference?

beat | pant |


As nouns the difference between beat and pant

is that beat is a pulsation or throb or beat can be a beatnik while pant is a quick breathing; a catching of the breath; a gasp or pant can be (fashion) a pair of pants (trousers or underpants) or pant can be a public drinking fountain in scotland and north-east england.

As verbs the difference between beat and pant

is that beat is to hit; to knock; to pound; to strike while pant is (ambitransitive) to breathe quickly or in a labored manner, as after exertion or from eagerness or excitement; to respire with heaving of the breast; to gasp.

As a adjective beat

is (us slang) dilapidated, beat up.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

beat

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) beten, from (etyl) ). Compare (etyl) batre, (etyl) battre.

Noun

(en noun)
  • A stroke; a blow.
  • * Dryden
  • He, with a careless beat , / Struck out the mute creation at a heat.
  • A pulsation or throb.
  • a beat''' of the heart; the '''beat of the pulse
  • A pulse on the beat level, the metric level at which pulses are heard as the basic unit. Thus a beat is the basic time unit of a piece.
  • A rhythm.
  • (music) A transient grace note, struck immediately before the one it is intended to ornament.
  • The interference between two tones of almost equal frequency
  • A short pause in a play, screenplay, or teleplay, for dramatic or comedic effect.
  • The route patrolled by a police officer or a guard.
  • to walk the beat
  • *
  • (by extension) An area of a person's responsibility, especially
  • # In journalism, the primary focus of a reporter's stories (such as police/courts, education, city government, business etc.).
  • (dated) A place of habitual or frequent resort.
  • (archaic) A low cheat or swindler.
  • ''a dead beat
  • The instrumental portion of a piece of hip-hop music.
  • Derived terms
    * afterbeat * backbeat, back beat * beat the meat * D-beat * deadbeat * downbeat * drumbeat * forebeat * heartbeat * inbeat * misbeat * offbeat * onbeat * outbeat * underbeat * upbeat * walk the beat
    See also
    * (piece of hip-hop music) track

    Verb

  • To hit; to knock; to pound; to strike.
  • As soon as she heard that Wiktionary was shutting down, she went into a rage and beat the wall with her fists until her knuckles bled.
  • * {{quote-news, date = 21 August 2012
  • , first = Ed , last = Pilkington , title = Death penalty on trial: should Reggie Clemons live or die? , newspaper = The Guardian , url = http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/aug/21/death-penalty-trial-reggie-clemons?newsfeed=true , page = , passage = In this account of events, the cards were stacked against Clemons from the beginning. His appeal lawyers have argued that he was physically beaten into making a confession, the jury was wrongfully selected and misdirected, and his conviction largely achieved on individual testimony with no supporting forensic evidence presented.}}
  • To strike or pound repeatedly, usually in some sort of rhythm.
  • He danced hypnotically while she beat the atabaque.
  • To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly.
  • * Bible, Judges xix. 22
  • The men of the city beat at the door.
  • * Dryden
  • Rolling tempests vainly beat below.
  • * Longfellow
  • They [winds] beat at the crazy casement.
  • * Bible, Jonath iv. 8
  • The sun beat upon the head of Jonah, that he fainted, and wished in himself to die.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • Public envy seemeth to beat chiefly upon ministers.
  • To move with pulsation or throbbing.
  • * Byron
  • A thousand hearts beat happily.
  • To win against; to defeat or overcome; to do better than, outdo, or excel (someone) in a particular, competitive event.
  • Jan had little trouble beating John in tennis. He lost five games in a row.
    No matter how quickly Joe finished his test, Roger always beat him.
    I just can't seem to beat the last level of this video game.
  • (nautical) To sail to windward using a series of alternate tacks across the wind.
  • To strike (water, foliage etc.) in order to drive out game; to travel through (a forest etc.) for hunting.
  • * 1955 , (Robin Jenkins), The Cone-Gatherers , Canongate 2012, p. 81:
  • The part of the wood to be beaten for deer sloped all the way from the roadside to the loch.
  • To mix food in a rapid fashion. Compare whip.
  • Beat the eggs and whip the cream.
  • (transitive, UK, In haggling for a price) of a buyer, to persuade the seller to reduce a price
  • He wanted $50 for it, but I managed to beat him down to $35.
  • (nonstandard)
  • * 1825? , "Hannah Limbrick, Executed for Murder", in The Newgate Calendar: comprising interesting memoirs of the most notorious characters , page 231:
  • Thomas Limbrick, who was only nine years of age, said he lived with his mother when Deborah was beat : that his mother throwed her down all along with her hands; and then against a wall
  • To indicate by beating or drumming.
  • to beat''' a retreat''; ''to '''beat to quarters
  • To tread, as a path.
  • * Blackmore
  • pass awful gulfs, and beat my painful way
  • To exercise severely; to perplex; to trouble.
  • * John Locke
  • Why should any one beat his head about the Latin grammar who does not intend to be a critic?
  • To be in agitation or doubt.
  • * Shakespeare
  • to still my beating mind
  • To make a sound when struck.
  • The drums beat .
  • (military) To make a succession of strokes on a drum.
  • The drummers beat to call soldiers to their quarters.
  • To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison.
  • Derived terms
    * beat a retreat * beat down * beat off * beater * beat about the bush * beat senseless * beat somebody to the punch * beat some sense into * beat the clock * beat the pants off * beat to quarters * beat up * beat to a pulp * bebeat * forbeat * inbeat * misbeat * overbeat * tobeat * underbeat * wife-beater

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (US slang) exhausted
  • After the long day, she was feeling completely beat .
  • dilapidated, beat up
  • Dude, you drive a beat car like that and you ain’t gonna get no honeys.
  • (gay slang) fabulous
  • Her makeup was beat!
  • (slang) boring
  • (slang, of a person) ugly
  • Synonyms
    * See also

    Etymology 2

    From (beatnik)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A beatnik.
  • Derived terms
    * beat generation

    References

    * DeLone et. al. (Eds.) (1975). Aspects of Twentieth-Century Music. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall. ISBN 0130493465.

    pant

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), whence also English dialectal (m). Possibly from (etyl) (m), a byform or of (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A quick breathing; a catching of the breath; a gasp.
  • (obsolete) A violent palpitation of the heart.
  • (Shakespeare)
    References
    * *

    Verb

  • (ambitransitive) To breathe quickly or in a labored manner, as after exertion or from eagerness or excitement; to respire with heaving of the breast; to gasp.
  • * Dryden
  • Pluto plants for breath from out his cell.
  • * Shelley
  • There is a cavern where my spirit / Was panted forth in anguish.
    {{quote-Fanny Hill, part=2 , Charles had just slipp'd the bolt of the door, and running, caught me in his arms, and lifting me from the ground, with his lips glew'd to mine, bore me, trembling, panting , dying, with soft fears and tender wishes, to the bed}}
  • To long for (something); to be eager for (something).
  • * Herbert
  • Then shall our hearts pant thee.
  • To long eagerly; to desire earnestly.
  • * Bible, Psalms xlii. 1
  • As the hart panteth after the water brooks.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Who pants for glory finds but short repose.
  • Of the heart, to beat with unnatural violence or rapidity; to palpitate.
  • (Spenser)
  • To sigh; to flutter; to languish.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • The whispering breeze / Pants on the leaves, and dies upon the trees.
    Synonyms
    * (breathe quickly or in a labored manner) gasp * (long for) crave, desire, long for, pine for * (long eagerly) crave, desire, long, pine * palpitate, pound, throb

    Etymology 2

    From pants

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (fashion) A pair of pants (trousers or underpants).
  • (used attributively as a modifier) Of or relating to pants.
  • Pant leg
    Derived terms
    * pant cuff * pant leg * pantsuit, pant suit * panty, panties

    Etymology 3

    Unknown

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • a public drinking fountain in Scotland and North-East England
  • References

    * PMSA page with several examples * OED 2nd edition