Battle vs Breathe - What's the difference?

battle | breathe |


As verbs the difference between battle and breathe

is that battle is to nourish; feed or battle can be to join in battle; to contend in fight; as, to battle over theories while breathe is to draw air into (inhale), and expel air from (exhale), the lungs in order to extract oxygen and excrete waste gases.

As an adjective battle

is improving; nutritious; fattening.

As a noun battle

is a general action, fight, or encounter, in which all the divisions of an army are or may be engaged; an engagement; a combat.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

battle

English

Etymology 1

From Early Modern English .

Alternative forms

*

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Improving; nutritious; fattening.
  • battle''' grass'', '''''battle pasture
  • Fertile; fruitful.
  • battle''' soil'', '''''battle land
    Derived terms
    *

    Verb

    (battl)
  • To nourish; feed.
  • To render fertile or fruitful, as in soil.
  • Derived terms
    * (l) *

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) (m), from ). Displaced native (etyl) .

    Alternative forms

    * batail

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A general action, fight, or encounter, in which all the divisions of an army are or may be engaged; an engagement; a combat.
  • A struggle; a contest.
  • :
  • *(rfdate) (Henry Morley) (1822-1894):
  • *:The whole intellectual battle that had at its centre the best poem of the best poet of that day.
  • *
  • *:In truth, Tottenham never really looked like taking all three points and this defeat means they face a battle to reach the knockout stages—with their next home game against PAOK Salonika on 30 November likely to prove decisive.
  • *2012', Clive James 'near the end' in cancer ' battle , ITV News, 21 June 2012:
  • *:Australian broadcaster Clive James has admitted that he is losing his long-fought battle with leukaemia.
  • A division of an army; a battalion.
  • *:
  • *:THenne kyng Arthur made redy his hoost in x batails' and Nero was redy in the felde afore the castel Tarabil with a grete hoost / & he had x ' batails with many mo peple than Arthur had
  • *(rfdate) (Francis Bacon) (1561-1626):
  • *:The king divided his army into three battles .
  • *(rfdate) (1721-1793):
  • *:The cavalry, by way of distinction, was called the battle , and on it alone depended the fate of every action.
  • *2000 , (George RR Martin), A Storm of Swords , Bantam 2011, page 634:
  • *:‘I will have more than twelve thousand men. I mean to divide them into three battles and start up the causeway a half-day apart.’
  • (label) The main body, as distinct from the vanguard and rear; battalia.
  • :(Hayward)
  • Synonyms
    * conflict * encounter * contest * action
    Derived terms
    * battlearray * battlefield * battleground / battle ground * battle of the sexes * battle piece * battle royal * battle song * do battle * drawn battle * fight a losing battle * give battle * join battle * pitched battle * wager of battle

    Verb

    (battl)
  • To join in battle; to contend in fight; as, to battle over theories.
  • She has been battling against cancer for years .
  • To assail in battle; to fight or struggle.
  • She has been battling cancer for years .

    References

    *

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * *

    breathe

    English

    Verb

  • To draw air into (inhale), and expel air from (exhale), the lungs in order to extract oxygen and excrete waste gases.
  • To take in needed gases and expel waste gases in a similar way.
  • :Fish have gills so they can breathe underwater.
  • To use (a gas) to sustain life.
  • :While life as we know it depends on oxygen, scientists have speculated that alien life forms might breathe chlorine or methane.
  • Figuratively, to live.
  • :I will not allow it, as long as I still breathe .
  • *(rfdate) Shakespeare
  • *:I am in health, I breathe .
  • *(rfdate) Sir Walter Scott
  • *:Breathes there a man with soul so dead?
  • To draw something into the lungs.
  • :Try not to breathe too much smoke.
  • To expel air from the lungs, exhale.
  • :If you breathe on a mirror, it will fog up.
  • To pass like breath; noiselessly or gently; to emanate; to blow gently.
  • :The wind breathes through the trees.
  • *(rfdate) Shakespeare
  • *:The air breathes upon us here most sweetly.
  • *(rfdate) Byron
  • *:There breathes a living fragrance from the shore.
  • To give an impression of, to exude.
  • :The decor positively breathes classical elegance.
  • To whisper quietly.
  • :He breathed the words into her ear, but she understood them all.
  • To exchange gases with the environment.
  • :Garments made of certain new materials breathe well and keep the skin relatively dry during exercise.
  • To rest; to stop and catch one's breath.
  • *:
  • *:Thenne they lasshed to gyder many sad strokes / & tracyd and trauercyd now bakward / now sydelyng hurtlyng to gyders lyke two bores / & that same tyme they felle both grouelyng to the erthe / Thus they fought styll withoute ony reposynge two houres and neuer brethed
  • *(rfdate) Shakespeare
  • *:Well! breathe awhile, and then to it again!
  • To stop, to give (a horse) an opportunity to catch its breath.
  • :At higher altitudes you need to breathe your horse more often.
  • Synonyms

    * (to draw air in and out) see

    Derived terms

    * *