Win vs Bat - What's the difference?

win | bat |


As a noun win

is pleasure; joy; delight or win can be gain; profit; income.

As a verb win

is to conquer, defeat.

As an acronym bat is

best available technology; a principle applying to regulations]] on limiting pollutant [[discharge|discharges.

win

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • Pleasure; joy; delight.
  • Derived terms
    * (l)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) . Cognate with (etyl) (m), (etyl) (m), (etyl) (m), (etyl) (m).

    Verb

  • To conquer, defeat.
  • *1485 , Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur , Book IV:
  • *:For and we doo bataille we two wyl fyghte with one kny?t at ones / and therfore yf ye wille fyghte soo we wille be redy at what houre ye wille assigne / And yf ye wynne vs in bataille the lady shal haue her landes ageyne / ye say wel sayd sir Vwayne / therfor make yow redy so that ye be here to morne in the defence of the ladyes ryght
  • *1998 , Rhapsody, Emerald Sword
  • *:For the glory, the power to win the Black Lord, I will search for the Emerald Sword.
  • (label) To triumph or achieve victory in (a game, a war, etc.).
  • (label) To gain (a prize) by succeeding in competition or contest.
  • :
  • (label) To obtain (someone) by wooing.
  • *Sir (Philip Sidney) (1554-1586)
  • *:Thy virtue won me; with virtue preserve me.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:She is a woman; therefore to be won .
  • (label) To achieve victory.
  • :
  • (label) To obtain (something desired).
  • :
  • (label) To cause a victory for someone.
  • :
  • :
  • To come to by toil or effort; to reach; to overtake.
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:Even in the porch he him did win .
  • *Sir (Walter Scott) (1771-1832)
  • *:And when the stony path began, / By which the naked peak they won , / Up flew the snowy ptarmigan.
  • To extract (ore, coal, etc.).
  • :(Raymond)
  • Derived terms
    * play to win * win friends * win up

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • gain; profit; income
  • wealth; owndom; goods
  • an individual victory (opposite of a loss)
  • Our first win of the season put us in high spirits.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=September 29 , author=Jon Smith , title=Tottenham 3 - 1 Shamrock Rovers , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=Giovani dos Santos smashed home a third five minutes later to wrap up the win .}}
  • (slang) a feat, an (extraordinary) achievement (opposite of a fail)
  • Derived terms

    * winning * winnings * winner * for the win * you win * win back * win through * win round * win out * win over * win-win English irregular verbs English three-letter words 1000 English basic words ----

    bat

    English

    (wikipedia bat)

    Etymology 1

    Dialectal variant (akin to the dialectal (etyl) term (m)) of (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) (compare (etyl) (m), (etyl) ).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Any of the small, nocturnal, flying mammals of the order Chiroptera, which navigate by means of echolocation.
  • *
  • *:The Bat—they called him the Bat. Like a bat' he chose the night hours for his work of rapine; like a '''bat''' he struck and vanished, pouncingly, noiselessly; like a ' bat he never showed himself to the face of the day.
  • *2012 , Suemedha Sood, (bbc.co.uk) Travelwise: Texas love bats] [sic
  • *:As well as being worth millions of dollars to the Texan agriculture industry, these mammals are worth millions of dollars to the state’s tourism industry. Texas is home to the world’s largest known bat' colony (in Comal County), and the world’s largest urban '''bat''' colony (in Austin). '''Bat''' watching is a common activity, with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department offering more ' bat -viewing sites than anywhere else in the US.
  • (lb) An old woman.
  • A whore who prowls in the dusk/evening like a bat.
  • Synonyms
    * (flying mammal)
    Derived terms
    * Batman * batlike * batshit * battish * batty * blind as a bat * fruit bat * have bats in the belfry * leaf-nosed bat * (little brown bat) * (brown bat) * like a bat out of hell * microbat * moonbat * vampire bat * vesper bat
    See also
    * * * (bat) * (Chiroptera)

    Etymology 2

    (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A club made of wood or aluminium used for striking the ball in sports such as baseball, softball and cricket.
  • A turn at hitting the ball with a bat in a game.
  • (two-up) The piece of wood on which the spinner places the coins and then uses for throwing them.Sidney J. Baker, The Australian Language , second edition, 1966, chapter XI section 3, page 242
  • (mining) Shale or bituminous shale.
  • (Kirwan)
  • A sheet of cotton used for filling quilts or comfortables; batting.
  • A part of a brick with one whole end.
  • Synonyms
    * (two-up) kip, stick, kylie, lannet
    Derived terms
    (derived terms) * baseball bat * batless * batman * bats * batsman * cricket bat

    Verb

    (batt)
  • to hit with a bat.
  • to take a turn at hitting a ball with a bat in sports like cricket, baseball and softball, as opposed to fielding.
  • to strike or swipe as though with a bat
  • The cat batted at the toy.
    Derived terms
    * bat five hundred * bat in * bat out * bat up * (verb)
    Hyponyms
    * Myotis

    References

    Etymology 3

    Possibly a variant of bate.

    Verb

  • to flutter: bat one's eyelashes .
  • Usage notes
    Most commonly used in phrase bat an eye, and variants thereof.
    Derived terms
    * bat an eye, bat an eyelash, bat an eyelid

    Etymology 4

    From (etyl) . "batman." Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Random House, Inc. 2009. Cognate to (m).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) packsaddle
  • Derived terms
    * batman

    References