Busted vs Basted - What's the difference?

busted | basted |


As verbs the difference between busted and basted

is that busted is (bust) while basted is (baste).

As an adjective busted

is (often used in combination with an adjective) having a certain type of bust or busted can be (slang) broke; having no money.

busted

English

Etymology 1

See bust (Etymology 1)

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • (often used in combination with an adjective) Having a certain type of bust .
  • Etymology 2

    See (Etymology 2)

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (slang) Broke; having no money.
  • I'd like to help you, but I'm busted .
  • (slang) Caught in the act of doing something one shouldn't do.
  • I saw you take that cookie from the cookie jar! You're busted !
  • * 2009 , , “New Year” (essay), in The Nearest Exit May Be Behind You , ISBN 9781458775856, ReadHowYouWant.com (2010), page 66:
  • Plus, to be honest, the look on his face when he realized how very busted they were was worth far more than the fifty dollars I paid for their dinner.
  • (slang) Extremely ugly.
  • She was cute, but all her friends were busted .
  • * 2004 July 30, "Ms Pnoopie Pnats" (username), "talking about hot or not...", in alt.support.shyness, Usenet :
  • ok this gals bod is hot but her face is busted
  • (slang) Tired.
  • (slang) Broken.
  • Synonyms
    * (tired)

    Verb

    (head)
  • (bust)
  • Anagrams

    * *

    basted

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (baste)
  • Anagrams

    *

    baste

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

    (bast)
  • To sew with long or loose stitches, as for temporary use, or in preparation for gathering the fabric.
  • * {{quote-news, year=1991, date=June 14, author=J.F. Pirro, title=Custom Work, work=Chicago Reader citation
  • , passage=He bastes the coat together with thick white thread almost like string, using stitches big enough to be ripped out easily later. }}

    Etymology 2

    .

    Verb

    (bast)
  • To sprinkle flour and salt and drip butter or fat on, as on meat in roasting.
  • (by extension) To coat over something
  • * {{quote-news, year=2001, date=April 20, author=Peter Margasak, title=Almost Famous, work=Chicago Reader citation
  • , passage=Ice Cold Daydream" bastes the bayou funk of the Meters in swirling psychedelia, while "Sweet Thang," a swampy blues cowritten with his dad, sounds like something from Dr. John's "Night Tripper" phase. }}
  • To mark (sheep, etc.) with tar.
  • Etymology 3

    Perhaps from the cookery sense of baste or from some Scandinavian source. Compare (etyl) (whence (etyl) ). Compare also (etyl) and (etyl)

    Verb

    (bast)
  • To beat with a stick; to cudgel.
  • * Samuel Pepys
  • One man was basted by the keeper for carrying some people over on his back through the waters.

    Anagrams

    * ----