Boasted vs Basted - What's the difference?

boasted | basted |


As verbs the difference between boasted and basted

is that boasted is (boast) while basted is (baste).

boasted

English

Verb

(head)
  • (boast)

  • boast

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) boosten, bosten, from .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A brag, a loud positive appraisal of oneself.
  • (squash) A shot where the ball is driven off a side wall and then strikes the front wall.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To brag; to talk loudly in praise of oneself.
  • * 2005 , (Plato), Sophist . Translation by Lesley Brown. .
  • On no account will he or any other kind be able to boast that he's escaped the pursuit of those who can follow so detailed and comprehensive a method of enquiry.
  • To speak of with pride, vanity, or exultation, with a view to self-commendation; to extol.
  • * (John Milton)
  • Lest bad men should boast / Their specious deeds.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-21, author=(Oliver Burkeman)
  • , volume=189, issue=2, page=27, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= The tao of tech , passage=The dirty secret of the internet is that all this distraction and interruption is immensely profitable. Web companies like to boast about "creating compelling content", or offering services that let you "stay up to date with what your friends are doing",
  • (obsolete) To speak in exulting language of another; to glory; to exult.
  • * Bible, Psalms xiiv. 8
  • In God we boast all the day long.
  • (squash) To play a .
  • (ergative) To possess something special.
  • Synonyms
    * brag
    Derived terms
    * boastful * boastfully * outboast

    Etymology 2

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (masonry) To dress, as a stone, with a broad chisel.
  • (Weale)
  • (sculpting) To shape roughly as a preparation for the finer work to follow; to cut to the general form required.
  • basted

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (baste)
  • Anagrams

    *

    baste

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

    (bast)
  • To sew with long or loose stitches, as for temporary use, or in preparation for gathering the fabric.
  • * {{quote-news, year=1991, date=June 14, author=J.F. Pirro, title=Custom Work, work=Chicago Reader citation
  • , passage=He bastes the coat together with thick white thread almost like string, using stitches big enough to be ripped out easily later. }}

    Etymology 2

    .

    Verb

    (bast)
  • To sprinkle flour and salt and drip butter or fat on, as on meat in roasting.
  • (by extension) To coat over something
  • * {{quote-news, year=2001, date=April 20, author=Peter Margasak, title=Almost Famous, work=Chicago Reader citation
  • , passage=Ice Cold Daydream" bastes the bayou funk of the Meters in swirling psychedelia, while "Sweet Thang," a swampy blues cowritten with his dad, sounds like something from Dr. John's "Night Tripper" phase. }}
  • To mark (sheep, etc.) with tar.
  • Etymology 3

    Perhaps from the cookery sense of baste or from some Scandinavian source. Compare (etyl) (whence (etyl) ). Compare also (etyl) and (etyl)

    Verb

    (bast)
  • To beat with a stick; to cudgel.
  • * Samuel Pepys
  • One man was basted by the keeper for carrying some people over on his back through the waters.

    Anagrams

    * ----