Flail vs Baste - What's the difference?

flail | baste | Related terms |

Flail is a related term of baste.


As nouns the difference between flail and baste

is that flail is a tool used for threshing, consisting of a long handle with a shorter stick attached with a short piece of chain, thong or similar material while baste is .

As a verb flail

is to beat using a flail or similar implement.

flail

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A tool used for threshing, consisting of a long handle with a shorter stick attached with a short piece of chain, thong or similar material.
  • A weapon which has the (usually spherical) striking part attached to the handle with a flexible joint such as a chain.
  • Quotations
    * 1631 — *: When in one night, ere glimpse of morn,
    His shadowy flail hath threshed the corn
    That ten day-labourers could not end; * 1816 — *: Huge fragments vaulted like rebounding hail,
    Or chaffy grain beneath the thresher's flail * 1842 — *: On him alone the curse of Cain
    Fell, like a flail on the garnered grain,
    And struck him to the earth! * 1879 — , ch V *: If the farmer must use the spade because he has not capital enough for a plough, the sickle instead of the reaping machine, the flail instead of the thresher...

    Coordinate terms

    *(weapon) nunchaku

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To beat using a flail or similar implement.
  • To wave or swing vigorously
  • *
  • * 1937 , ,
  • He stopped in his tracks – then, flailing his arms wildly in the air, began to stagger backwards.
  • To thresh.
  • To move like a flail.
  • He was flailing wildly, but didn't land a blow.

    Synonyms

    * thrash

    See also

    * (wikipedia "flail") *

    baste

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

    (bast)
  • To sew with long or loose stitches, as for temporary use, or in preparation for gathering the fabric.
  • * {{quote-news, year=1991, date=June 14, author=J.F. Pirro, title=Custom Work, work=Chicago Reader citation
  • , passage=He bastes the coat together with thick white thread almost like string, using stitches big enough to be ripped out easily later. }}

    Etymology 2

    .

    Verb

    (bast)
  • To sprinkle flour and salt and drip butter or fat on, as on meat in roasting.
  • (by extension) To coat over something
  • * {{quote-news, year=2001, date=April 20, author=Peter Margasak, title=Almost Famous, work=Chicago Reader citation
  • , passage=Ice Cold Daydream" bastes the bayou funk of the Meters in swirling psychedelia, while "Sweet Thang," a swampy blues cowritten with his dad, sounds like something from Dr. John's "Night Tripper" phase. }}
  • To mark (sheep, etc.) with tar.
  • Etymology 3

    Perhaps from the cookery sense of baste or from some Scandinavian source. Compare (etyl) (whence (etyl) ). Compare also (etyl) and (etyl)

    Verb

    (bast)
  • To beat with a stick; to cudgel.
  • * Samuel Pepys
  • One man was basted by the keeper for carrying some people over on his back through the waters.

    Anagrams

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