Batter vs Baste - What's the difference?

batter | baste |


As nouns the difference between batter and baste

is that batter is a beaten mixture of flour and liquid (usually egg and milk), used for baking (eg pancakes, cake, or yorkshire pudding) or to coat food (eg fish) prior to frying or batter can be an incline on the outer face of a built wall or batter can be (baseball) the player attempting to hit the ball with a bat while baste is .

As a verb batter

is to hit or strike violently and repeatedly or batter can be (architecture) to slope (of walls, buildings etc).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

batter

English

(wikipedia batter)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) .

Verb

(en verb)
  • to hit or strike violently and repeatedly.
  • He battered his wife with a walking stick.
  • to coat with batter (the food ingredient).
  • I prefer it when they batter the cod with breadcrumbs.
  • to defeat soundly; to thrash
  • Leeds United battered Charlton 7-0.
  • (UK, slang, usually in the passive) To intoxicate
  • That cocktails will batter you!
    I was battered last night on our pub crawl.
  • (metalworking) To flatten (metal) by hammering, so as to compress it inwardly and spread it outwardly.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A beaten mixture of flour and liquid (usually egg and milk), used for baking (e.g. pancakes, cake, or Yorkshire pudding) or to coat food (e.g. fish) prior to frying
  • To the dismay of his mother, the boy put his finger into the cake batter .
  • A binge, a heavy drinking session.
  • When he went on a batter , he became very violent.
  • A paste of clay or loam.
  • (Holland)
  • (printing) A bruise on the face of a plate or of type in the form.
  • Etymology 3

    .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (architecture) To slope (of walls, buildings etc.).
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • An incline on the outer face of a built wall.
  • Hydroseeding of unvegetated batters is planned.

    Etymology 4

    .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (baseball) The player attempting to hit the ball with a bat.
  • The first batter hit the ball into the corner for a double.
    Synonyms
    * (baseball) (l)

    Anagrams

    * English agent nouns ----

    baste

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

    (bast)
  • To sew with long or loose stitches, as for temporary use, or in preparation for gathering the fabric.
  • * {{quote-news, year=1991, date=June 14, author=J.F. Pirro, title=Custom Work, work=Chicago Reader citation
  • , passage=He bastes the coat together with thick white thread almost like string, using stitches big enough to be ripped out easily later. }}

    Etymology 2

    .

    Verb

    (bast)
  • To sprinkle flour and salt and drip butter or fat on, as on meat in roasting.
  • (by extension) To coat over something
  • * {{quote-news, year=2001, date=April 20, author=Peter Margasak, title=Almost Famous, work=Chicago Reader citation
  • , passage=Ice Cold Daydream" bastes the bayou funk of the Meters in swirling psychedelia, while "Sweet Thang," a swampy blues cowritten with his dad, sounds like something from Dr. John's "Night Tripper" phase. }}
  • To mark (sheep, etc.) with tar.
  • Etymology 3

    Perhaps from the cookery sense of baste or from some Scandinavian source. Compare (etyl) (whence (etyl) ). Compare also (etyl) and (etyl)

    Verb

    (bast)
  • To beat with a stick; to cudgel.
  • * Samuel Pepys
  • One man was basted by the keeper for carrying some people over on his back through the waters.

    Anagrams

    * ----