Base vs Part - What's the difference?

base | part |


As nouns the difference between base and part

is that base is something from which other things extend; a foundation or base can be while part is (label) a portion; a component .

As verbs the difference between base and part

is that base is to give as its foundation or starting point; to lay the foundation of while part is (lb) to leave.

As adjectives the difference between base and part

is that base is (obsolete) low in height; short while part is fractional; partial.

As an acronym base

is .

As an adverb part is

partly; partially; fractionally.

base

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) base, from (etyl) basis, from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • Something from which other things extend; a foundation.
  • # A supporting, lower or bottom component of a structure or object.
  • #* {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=14 citation , passage=Nanny Broome was looking up at the outer wall. Just under the ceiling there were three lunette windows, heavily barred and blacked out in the normal way by centuries of grime. Their bases were on a level with the pavement outside, a narrow way which was several feet lower than the road behind the house.}}
  • The starting point of a logical deduction or thought; basis.
  • A permanent structure for housing military personnel and material.
  • The place where decisions for an organization are made; headquarters.
  • (cooking, painting, pharmacy) A basic but essential component or ingredient.
  • A substance used as a mordant in dyeing.
  • (Ure)
  • (lb) Foundation: a cosmetic cream to make the face appear uniform.
  • (chemistry) Any of a class of generally water-soluble compounds, having bitter taste, that turn red litmus blue, and react with acids to form salts.
  • Important areas in games and sports.
  • # A safe zone in the children's games of tag and hide-and-go-seek.
  • # (baseball) One of the three places that a runner can stand without being subject to being tagged out.
  • (architecture) The lowermost part of a column, between the shaft and the pedestal or pavement.
  • (biology, biochemistry) A nucleotide's nucleobase in the context of a DNA or RNA biopolymer.
  • (botany) The end of a leaf, petal or similar organ where it is attached to its support.
  • (electronics) The name of the controlling terminal of a bipolar transistor (BJT).
  • (geometry) The lowest side of a in a triangle or other polygon, or the lowest face of a cone, pyramid or other polyhedron laid flat.
  • (heraldiccharge) The lowest third of a shield or escutcheon.
  • (mathematics) A number raised to the power of an exponent.
  • The logarithm to base 2 of 8 is 3.
  • (mathematics) Alternative to radix.
  • (topology) The set of sets from which a topology is generated.
  • (topology) A topological space, looked at in relation to one of its covering spaces, fibrations, or bundles.
  • (cheerleading) A cheerleader who stays on the ground.
  • (linguistics) A morpheme (or morphemes) that serves as a basic foundation on which affixes can be attached.
  • (music)
  • * Dryden
  • The trebles squeak for fear, the bases roar.
  • (military, historical) The smallest kind of cannon.
  • (heraldry) The lower part of the field. See escutcheon.
  • The housing of a horse.
  • (historical, in the plural) A kind of skirt (often of velvet or brocade, but sometimes of mailed armour) which hung from the middle to about the knees, or lower.
  • (obsolete) The lower part of a robe or petticoat.
  • (obsolete) An apron.
  • * Marston
  • bakers in their linen bases
  • A line in a survey which, being accurately determined in length and position, serves as the origin from which to compute the distances and positions of any points or objects connected with it by a system of triangles.
  • (Lyman)
    Synonyms
    * (chemical compound that will neutralize an acid) alkali
    Antonyms
    * (chemical compound that will neutralize an acid) acid * (end of a leaf) apex
    Derived terms
    * air base * base bag * baseball * baseband * baseboard * base box * base-burner * base camp * base censor * base coat * base color/base colour * base course * base exchange * base hospital * baseless * baselevel * baseline * basely * base load * baseman * basement * base molding/base moulding * base out * base over apex * baseperson * baseplate * base-player * base-playing * base point * base port * base radio * base rate * base ring * baserunner/base runner * base-running/baserunning * base ship * base shoot * base squadron * base station * base-stealer * base-stealing * base substitution * base table * base unit * base wallah * basewoman * counterbase * cover one's bases * database * debase * first base * freebase * home base * knowledge base * leuco-base * make first base * moonbase * off base * on base * power base * prisoner's base, prisoners' base * second base * subbase * surbase * third base * wheelbase

    Verb

    (bas)
  • To give as its foundation or starting point; to lay the foundation of.
  • *
  • Firstly, I continue to base most species treatments on personally collected material, rather than on herbarium plants.
  • To be located (at a particular place).
  • Derived terms
    * -based * base on

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) bas, from .

    Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • (obsolete) Low in height; short.
  • base shrubs
    (Shakespeare)
  • Low in place or position.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (obsolete) Of low value or degree.
  • * , II.3:
  • If thou livest in paine and sorrow, thy base courage is the cause of it, To die there wanteth but will.
  • (archaic) Of low social standing or rank; vulgar, common.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • a pleasant and base swain
  • Morally reprehensible, immoral; cowardly.
  • * Robynson (More's Utopia)
  • a cruel act of a base and a cowardish mind
  • * Milton
  • base ingratitude
  • * {{quote-book, year=1905, author=
  • , title= , chapter=1 citation , passage=“Mrs. Yule's chagrin and horror at what she called her son's base ingratitude knew no bounds ; at first it was even thought that she would never get over it.
  • Inferior; unworthy, of poor quality.
  • Designating those metals which are not classed as (precious) or (noble).
  • Alloyed with inferior metal; debased.
  • base''' coin;  '''base bullion
  • (obsolete) Of illegitimate birth; bastard.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Why bastard? wherefore base ?
  • Not classical or correct.
  • base Latin
    (Fuller)
  • the base tone of a violin
  • (legal) Not held by honourable service.
  • A base''' estate is one held by services not honourable, or held by villenage. Such a tenure is called '''base''', or low, and the tenant is a '''base tenant.
    Usage notes
    * Said of fellows, motives, occupations, etc.
    Synonyms
    * bad, vile, malicious, destructive, reprehensible, knavish, evil
    Antonyms
    * likeable * desirable * admirable * noble
    Derived terms
    * base-born * base-bred * base coin * base estate * base fee * basely * base metal * base-minded * baseness * base-spirited * base tenant * base tenure * base-witted

    Etymology 3

    Probably a specific use of Etymology 1, above; perhaps also a development of the plural of (bar).

    Noun

    (-)
  • * Shakespeare
  • to run the country base
  • * 1596 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , V.8:
  • So ran they all, as they had bene at bace , / They being chased that did others chase.

    Etymology 4

    Variant forms.

    Acronym

    (Acronym) (head)
  • Derived terms
    * base jumper * base jumping

    See also

    * (wikipedia "base") *

    Anagrams

    * * 1000 English basic words ----

    part

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (label) A portion; a component.
  • #A fraction of a whole.
  • #:
  • #*
  • #*:Hepaticology, outside the temperate parts of the Northern Hemisphere, still lies deep in the shadow cast by that ultimate "closet taxonomist," Franz Stephani—a ghost whose shadow falls over us all.
  • #*{{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-01, volume=407, issue=8838, page=11, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Towards the end of poverty , passage=America’s poverty line is $63 a day for a family of four. In the richer parts of the emerging world $4 a day is the poverty barrier. But poverty’s scourge is fiercest below $1.25 ([…]): people below that level live lives that are poor, nasty, brutish and short.}}
  • #A distinct element.
  • #:
  • #*
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=8 , passage=It had been arranged as part of the day's programme that Mr. Cooke was to drive those who wished to go over the Rise in his new brake.}}
  • #*{{quote-magazine, date=2012-12-01, volume=405, issue=8813, page=3 (Technology Quarterly), magazine=(The Economist), title= An internet of airborne things
  • , passage=A farmer could place an order for a new tractor part' by text message and pay for it by mobile money-transfer. A supplier many miles away would then take the ' part to the local matternet station for airborne dispatch via drone.}}
  • #A group inside a larger group.
  • #Share, especially of a profit.
  • #:
  • #A unit of relative proportion in a mixture.
  • #:
  • #3.5 centiliters of one ingredient in a mixed drink.
  • #A section of a document.
  • #:
  • #A section of land; an area of a country or other territory; region.
  • #*1590 , (Edmund Spenser), (The Faerie Queene) , II.vi:
  • #*:the Faery knight / Besought that Damzell suffer him depart, / And yield him readie passage to that other part .
  • # A factor.
  • #:
  • Duty; responsibility.
  • :
  • #Position or role (especially in a play).
  • #:
  • #*
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=2 , passage=We drove back to the office with some concern on my part at the prospect of so large a case. Sunning himself on the board steps, I saw for the first time Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke. He was dressed out in broad gaiters and bright tweeds, like an English tourist, and his face might have belonged to Dagon, idol of the Philistines.}}
  • #*, chapter=5
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=He was thinking; but the glory of the song, the swell from the great organ, the clustered lights,
  • #(label) The melody played or sung by a particular instrument, voice, or group of instruments or voices, within a polyphonic piece.
  • #:
  • #Each of two contrasting sides of an argument, debate etc.; "hand".
  • #*, II.15:
  • #*:the fruition of life cannot perfectly be pleasing unto us, if we stand in any feare to lose it. A man might nevertheless say on the contrary part , that we embrace and claspe this good so much the harder, and with more affection, as we perceive it to be less sure, and feare it should be taken from us.
  • #*Bible, (w), ix.40:
  • #*:He that is not against us is on our part .
  • #*(Edmund Waller) (1606-1687)
  • #*:Make whole kingdoms take her brother's part .
  • (US) The dividing line formed by combing the hair in different directions.
  • :
  • (label) In the Hebrew lunisolar calendar, a unit of time equivalent to 3? seconds. (jump)
  • A constituent of character or capacity; quality; faculty; talent; usually in the plural with a collective sense.
  • *(Edmund Burke) (1729-1797)
  • *:men of considerable parts
  • * (1800-1859)
  • *:great quickness of parts
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:which maintained so politic a state of evil, that they will not admit any good part to intermingle with them.
  • Synonyms

    * portion, component, element * faction, party * position, role * parting (UK), (l), (l)/(l) * (jump) chelek * See also

    Holonyms

    * whole

    Derived terms

    * part and parcel * part of speech

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb) To leave.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:He wrung Bassanio's hand, and so they parted .
  • *(Anthony Trollope) (1815-1882)
  • *:It was strange to him that a father should feel no tenderness at parting with an only son.
  • *(George Eliot) (1819-1880)
  • *:his precious bag, which he would by no means part from
  • To cut hair with a parting; shed.
  • (lb) To divide in two.
  • :
  • *1884 , (Mark Twain), (The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn), Chapter VII
  • *:I run the canoe into a deep dent in the bank that I knowed about; I had to part the willow branches to get in; and when I made fast nobody could a seen the canoe from the outside.
  • (lb) To be divided in two or separated; shed.
  • :
  • To divide up; to share.
  • *1526 , (William Tyndale), trans. (Bible) , (w) III:
  • *:He that hath ij. cootes, lett hym parte with hym that hath none: And he that hath meate, let him do lyke wyse.
  • *(Bible), (w) xix. 24
  • *:They parted my raiment among them.
  • *(Alexander Pope) (1688-1744)
  • *:to part his throne, and share his heaven with thee
  • *, II.x:
  • *:He left three sonnes, his famous progeny, / Borne of faire Inogene of Italy; / Mongst whom he parted his imperiall state
  • (lb) To have a part or share; to partake.
  • *(Bible), 1 (w) xxx. 24
  • *:They shall part alike.
  • To separate or disunite; to remove from contact or contiguity; to sunder.
  • *(Bible), (w) xxiv. 51
  • *:While he blessed them, he was parted from them, and carried up into heaven.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:The narrow seas that part / The French and English.
  • *
  • *:"A fine man, that Dunwody, yonder," commented the young captain, as they parted , and as he turned to his prisoner. "We'll see him on in Washington some day. He is strengthening his forces now against Mr. Benton out there.."
  • (lb) To hold apart; to stand or intervene between.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:The stumbling night did part our weary powers.
  • To separate by a process of extraction, elimination, or secretion.
  • :
  • *(Matthew Prior) (1664-1721)
  • *:The liver minds his own affair,/ And parts and strains the vital juices.
  • To leave; to quit.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:since presently your souls must part your bodies
  • To leave (an IRC channel).
  • *2000 , "Phantom", Re: Uhm... hi... I guess...'' (on newsgroup ''alt.support.boy-lovers )
  • *:He parted the channel saying "SHUTUP!"since then, I've been seeing him on IRC every day (really can't imagine him not being on IRC anymore actually).
  • Derived terms

    * part ways * part with

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Fractional; partial.
  • Fred was part owner of the car.

    Adverb

    (-)
  • Partly; partially; fractionally.
  • Derived terms

    * part-finance * take part

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * prat, rapt, tarp, trap 1000 English basic words ----