What is the difference between barony and baron?

barony | baron |


As nouns the difference between barony and baron

is that barony is a dominion ruled by a baron or baroness, often part of a larger kingdom or empire while baron is the male ruler of a barony.

barony

English

Noun

(baronies)
  • A dominion ruled by a baron or baroness, often part of a larger kingdom or empire.
  • A medieval land measure equal to 4000 acres (100 hides).
  • Anagrams

    * *

    baron

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The male ruler of a barony.
  • A male member of the lowest rank of British nobility.
  • A particular cut of beef, made up of a double sirloin.
  • * 1851 , (Herman Melville), (Moby-Dick) ,
  • Such portentous appetites had Queequeg and Tashtego, that to fill out the vacancies made by the previous repast, often the pale Dough-Boy was fain to bring on a great baron of salt-junk, seemingly quarried out of the solid ox.
  • A person of great power in society, especially in business and politics.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-10, volume=408, issue=8848, magazine=(The Economist), author=Lexington
  • , title= Keeping the mighty honest , passage=British journalists shun complete respectability, feeling a duty to be ready to savage the mighty, or rummage through their bins. Elsewhere in Europe, government contracts and subsidies ensure that press barons will only defy the mighty so far.}}
  • (legal, obsolete) A husband.
  • baron and feme: husband and wife

    Derived terms

    * baron and femme * barony * robber baron

    Anagrams

    *

    References

    * "baron n. ", Oxford English Dictionary, Second edition, 1989; first published in New English Dictionary, 1885. ----