Crow vs Bark - What's the difference?

crow | bark |


As a proper noun crow

is a native american tribe or crow can be .

As a noun bark is

(three-masted vessel).

crow

English

(wikipedia crow)

Etymology 1

(etyl) ‘to crow’. See below.

Noun

(en noun)
  • A bird, usually black, of the genus Corvus , having a strong conical beak, with projecting bristles; it has a harsh, croaking call.
  • * 1922 , E.R. Eddison, The Worm Ouroborus
  • Gaslark in his splendour on the golden stairs saying adieu to those three captains and their matchless armament foredoomed to dogs and crows on Salapanta Hills.
  • A bar of iron with a beak, crook, or claw; a bar of iron used as a lever; a crowbar.
  • * 1796 , Matthew Lewis, The Monk , Folio Society 1985, page 267:
  • He approached the humble tomb in which Antonia reposed. He had provided himself with an iron crow and a pick-axe: but this precaution was unnecessary.
  • The cry of the rooster.
  • A gangplank () used by the Roman navy to board enemy ships.
  • (among butchers) The mesentery of an animal.
  • Synonyms
    * (bar) crowbar * (cry of a rooster) cock-a-doodle-doo
    Derived terms
    * American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos ) * as the crow flies * Australian crow (Corvus orru ) * Banggai crow (Corvus unicolor ) * bare-faced crow (Corvus tristis ) * Bismarck crow (Corvus insularis ) * black crow (Corvus capensis ) * Bougainville crow (Corvus meeki ) * brown-headed crow (Corvus fuscicapillus ) * cape crow (Corvus capensis ) * carrion crow (Corvus corone ) * Celebes pied crow (Corvus typicus ) * collared crow (Corvus torquatus ) * Cuban crow (Corvus nasicus ) * Danish crow * eastern jungle crow (Corvus (macrorhynchos) levaillantii ) * eat crow * Eurasian crow (Corvus corone ) * fish crow (Corvus ossifragus ) * Flores crow (Corvus florensis ) * grey crow (Corvus tristis ) * Hawaiian crow (Corvus hawaiiensis'', ''Corvus tropicus ) * high-billed crow * hooded crow (Corvus cornix ) * hoodiecrow * house crow (Corvus splendens ) * Indian house crow (Corvus splendens ) * Indian jungle crow (Corvus (macrorhynchos) culminatus ) * Iraq pied crow (Corvus (cornix) capellanus ) * Jamaican crow (Corvus jamaicensis ) * jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos ) * large-billed crow (Corvus (macrorhynchos) macrorhynchos ) * little crow (Corvus bennetti ) * long-billed crow (Corvus validus ) * Mariana crow (Corvus kubaryi ) * Mesopotamian crow (Corvus (cornix) capellanus ) * New Caledonian crow (Corvus moneduloides ) * New Ireland crow * northwestern crow (Corvus caurinus ) * palm crow (Corvus palmarum ) * pied crow (Corvus albus ) * piping crow (Corvus typicus ) * Puerto Rican crow (Corvus pumilis ) * Robust crow (Corvus viriosus ) * Salomon Islands crow (Corvus meeki'', ''Corvus woodfordi ) * Scotch crow * Sinaloan crow (Corvus sinaloae ) * slender-billed crow (Corvus enca ) * Somali crow (Corvus (ruficolis) edithae ) * stone the crows * Tamaulipas crow (Corvus imparatus ) * Torresian crow (Corvus orru ) * violaceous crow (Corvus (enca) violaceus ) * white-billed crow (Corvus woodfordi ) * white-necked crow (Corvus leucognaphalus )
    See also
    * caw * murder of crows (= flock of crows) * raven

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) ). Related to (m).

    Verb

  • To make the shrill sound characteristic of a rooster; to make a sound in this manner, either in joy, gaiety, or defiance.
  • * Shakespeare
  • The morning cock crew loud.
  • * 1962 , (Bob Dylan),
  • When your rooster crows at the break o' dawn
    Look out your window and I'll be gone.
  • To shout in exultation or defiance; to brag.
  • He's been crowing all day about winning the game of cards.
  • To utter a sound expressive of joy or pleasure.
  • * Tennyson
  • the sweetest little maid that ever crowed for kisses
  • * 1913 , :
  • Hearing the miner's footsteps, the baby would put up his arms and crow .
  • (music) To test the reed of a double reed instrument by placing the reed alone in the mouth and blowing it.
  • bark

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) barken, berken, borken, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs (said of animals, especially dogs).
  • The neighbour's dog is always barking .
    The seal barked as the zookeeper threw fish into its enclosure.
  • To make a clamor; to make importunate outcries.
  • * (rfdate), Tyndale.
  • They bark , and say the Scripture maketh heretics.
  • * (rfdate), Fuller
  • Where there is the barking of the belly, there no other commands will be heard, much less obeyed. .
  • To speak sharply.
  • The sergeant barked an order.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011
  • , date=January 5 , author=Mark Ashenden , title=Wolverhampton 1 - 0 Chelsea , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=While McCarthy prowled the touchline barking orders, his opposite number watched on motionless and expressionless and, with 25 minutes to go, decided to throw on Nicolas Anelka for Kalou.}}
    Usage notes
    Historically, bork'' existed as a past tense form and ''borken as a past participle, but both forms are now obsolete.
    Derived terms
    * bark up the wrong tree * barking * barking dogs never bite * bebark * dogs bark *
    Synonyms
    * latrate (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog.
  • A similar sound made by some other animals.
  • (figuratively) An abrupt loud vocal utterance.
  • * circa 1921 , The Cambridge History of English and American Literature , vol 11:
  • Fox’s clumsy figure, negligently dressed in blue and buff, seemed unprepossessing; only his shaggy eyebrows added to the expression of his face; his voice would rise to a bark in excitement.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) bark, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (wikipedia bark)
  • (countable, uncountable) The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree.
  • * '>citation
  • Moving about 70 miles per hour, it crashed through the sturdy old-growth trees, snapping their limbs and shredding bark from their trunks.
  • (medicine) Peruvian bark or Jesuit's bark, the bark of the cinchona from which quinine is produced.
  • The crust formed on barbecued meat that has had a rub applied to it.
  • * 2009 , Julie Reinhardt, She-Smoke: A Backyard Barbecue Book , page 151:
  • This softens the meat further, but at some loss of crunch to the bark .
    Usage notes
    Usually uncountable; bark may be countable when referring to the barks of different types of tree.
    Synonyms
    * (exterior covering of a tree) rind

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To strip the bark from; to peel.
  • To abrade or rub off any outer covering from.
  • to bark one’s heel
  • To girdle.
  • To cover or inclose with bark, or as with bark.
  • bark the roof of a hut

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) , from Egyptian b?re .

    Alternative forms

    * barque

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A small sailing vessel, e.g. a pinnace or a fishing smack; a rowing boat or barge.
  • (poetic) a sailing vessel or boat of any kind.
  • * circa 1609 , William Shakespeare, Sonnet 116:
  • It is the star to every wandering bark
  • * circa 1880 , among the Poems of Emily Dickinson:
  • Whether my bark went down at sea, Whether she met with gales,
  • (nautical) A three-masted vessel, having her foremast and mainmast square-rigged, and her mizzenmast schooner-rigged.