Batter vs Banter - What's the difference?

batter | banter |


As verbs the difference between batter and banter

is that batter is to hit or strike violently and repeatedly or batter can be (architecture) to slope (of walls, buildings etc) while banter is to engage in banter or playful conversation.

As nouns the difference between batter and banter

is that batter is a beaten mixture of flour and liquid (usually egg and milk), used for baking (eg pancakes, cake, or yorkshire pudding) or to coat food (eg fish) prior to frying or batter can be an incline on the outer face of a built wall or batter can be (baseball) the player attempting to hit the ball with a bat while banter is good-humoured, playful, typically spontaneous conversation.

batter

English

(wikipedia batter)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) .

Verb

(en verb)
  • to hit or strike violently and repeatedly.
  • He battered his wife with a walking stick.
  • to coat with batter (the food ingredient).
  • I prefer it when they batter the cod with breadcrumbs.
  • to defeat soundly; to thrash
  • Leeds United battered Charlton 7-0.
  • (UK, slang, usually in the passive) To intoxicate
  • That cocktails will batter you!
    I was battered last night on our pub crawl.
  • (metalworking) To flatten (metal) by hammering, so as to compress it inwardly and spread it outwardly.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A beaten mixture of flour and liquid (usually egg and milk), used for baking (e.g. pancakes, cake, or Yorkshire pudding) or to coat food (e.g. fish) prior to frying
  • To the dismay of his mother, the boy put his finger into the cake batter .
  • A binge, a heavy drinking session.
  • When he went on a batter , he became very violent.
  • A paste of clay or loam.
  • (Holland)
  • (printing) A bruise on the face of a plate or of type in the form.
  • Etymology 3

    .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (architecture) To slope (of walls, buildings etc.).
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • An incline on the outer face of a built wall.
  • Hydroseeding of unvegetated batters is planned.

    Etymology 4

    .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (baseball) The player attempting to hit the ball with a bat.
  • The first batter hit the ball into the corner for a double.
    Synonyms
    * (baseball) (l)

    Anagrams

    * English agent nouns ----

    banter

    English

    Noun

    (-)
  • Good-humoured, playful, typically spontaneous conversation.
  • It seemed like I'd have to listen to her playful banter for hours.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To engage in banter or playful conversation.
  • To play or do something amusing.
  • To tease (someone) mildly.
  • * Washington Irving
  • Hag-ridden by my own fancy all night, and then bantered on my haggard looks the next day.
  • * Charlotte Brontë
  • Mr. Sweeting was bantered about his stature—he was a little man, a mere boy in height and breadth compared with the athletic Malone
  • To joke about; to ridicule (a trait, habit, etc.).
  • * Chatham
  • If they banter' your regularity, order, and love of study, ' banter in return their neglect of them.
  • To delude or trick; to play a prank upon.
  • * Daniel De Foe
  • We diverted ourselves with bantering several poor scholars with hopes of being at least his lordship's chaplain.
  • (transitive, US, Southern and Western, colloquial) To challenge to a match.
  • Synonyms

    * (tease) kid, wind up

    Derived terms

    * (l)

    References

    Anagrams

    *