Bailiff vs Myrmidon - What's the difference?

bailiff | myrmidon |


As nouns the difference between bailiff and myrmidon

is that bailiff is (legal) a legal officer to whom some degree of authority, care or jurisdiction is committed while myrmidon is a soldier or a subordinate civil officer who executes orders of a superior without protest or pity; -- sometimes applied to bailiffs, constables, etc.

bailiff

Noun

(en noun)
  • (legal) A legal officer to whom some degree of authority, care or jurisdiction is committed.
  • (British) The steward or overseer of an estate.
  • * , chapter=19
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Nothing was too small to receive attention, if a supervising eye could suggest improvements likely to conduce to the common welfare. Mr. Gordon Burnage, for instance, personally visited dust-bins and back premises, accompanied by a sort of village bailiff , going his round like a commanding officer doing billets.}}
  • (Channel Islands) The Chief Justice in each of the Channel Island bailiwicks of Jersey and Guernsey, also serving as president of the legislature and having ceremonial and executive functions.
  • * '>citation
  • myrmidon

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A soldier or a subordinate civil officer who executes orders of a superior without protest or pity (sometimes applied to bailiffs, constables, etc).
  • *1842', "Sweeney Todd, The Demon Barber of Fleet Street" (a play by George Dibden Pitt based on an existing story) at Act III, Scene II:
    Tobias (to Jonas Fogg, manager of a madhouse): "I will die ere I submit to you or your vile '
    myrmidons
    ."
  • *1934 , edition, ISBN 0553278193, pages 177–178:
  • See also

    * catchpole, catchpoll