Baffle vs Baffie - What's the difference?

baffle | baffie |


As nouns the difference between baffle and baffie

is that baffle is a device used to dampen the effects of such things as sound, light, or fluid specifically, a baffle is a surface which is placed inside an open area to inhibit direct motion from one part to another, without preventing motion altogether while baffie is (golf) a traditional name for a.

As a verb baffle

is (obsolete) to publicly disgrace, especially of a recreant knight.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

baffle

English

Verb

(baffl)
  • (obsolete) To publicly disgrace, especially of a recreant knight.
  • * 1596 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , VI.7:
  • He by the heeles him hung upon a tree, / And baffuld so, that all which passed by / The picture of his punishment might see […].
  • (obsolete) To hoodwink or deceive (someone).
  • (Barrow)
  • To bewilder completely; to confuse or perplex.
  • I am baffled by the contradictions and omissions in the instructions.
  • * Prescott
  • calculations so difficult as to have baffled , until within a recent period, the most enlightened nations
  • * John Locke
  • The mere intricacy of a question should not baffle us.
  • * Cowper
  • the art that baffles time's tyrannic claim
  • * South
  • a suitable scripture ready to repel and baffle them all
  • To struggle in vain.
  • A ship baffles with the winds.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A device used to dampen the effects of such things as sound, light, or fluid. Specifically, a baffle is a surface which is placed inside an open area to inhibit direct motion from one part to another, without preventing motion altogether.
  • Tanker trucks use baffles to keep the liquids inside from sloshing around.
  • An architectural feature designed to confuse enemies or make them vulnerable.
  • baffie

    English

    Alternative forms

    * baffy

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (golf) A traditional name for a
  • (Scotland) A slipper, or a worn, comfortable shoe.
  • * 2000 , Kate Atkinson, Emotionally Weird , Macmillan (2001), ISBN 978-0-312-27999-8, page 40:
  • ; the inhabitants' benign indifference to idiosyncratic behavior (the way, for example, that you could walk down the street in nothing but a pair of baffies with a budgerigar on your head and no-one would think twice of it).
  • * 2001 , Janet Paisley, Not for Glory , Canongate, ISBN 9781841951744, page 241:
  • put him oot the door in his semmit an his baffies .
  • * 2003 , Katie MacAlister, Men in Kilts , Penguin Group, ISBN 978-0-451-41113-6, page 87:
  • “You can’t be walking about in the muck with naught but your skirts and baffies'. ” ¶ By process of elimination I narrowed the word ' baffies to mean some sort of footwear.

    References

    * “ baffies” in Betty Kirkpatrick, The Concise Dictionary of Scottish Words and Phrases , Crombie Jardine Publishing (2006), ISBN 978-1-905102-88-4.