Saddest vs Baddest - What's the difference?

saddest | baddest |


As adjectives the difference between saddest and baddest

is that saddest is (sad) while baddest is (nonstandard) (bad).

saddest

English

Adjective

(head)
  • (sad)

  • sad

    English

    Adjective

    (sadder)
  • (label) Sated, having had one's fill; satisfied, weary.
  • (label) Steadfast, valiant.
  • *, Book V:
  • *:And thus they strekyn forth into the stremys, many sadde hunderthes.
  • (label) Dignified, serious, grave.
  • *, II.xi:
  • *:Vprose Sir Guyon, in bright armour clad, / And to his purposd iourney him prepar'd: / With him the Palmer eke in habit sad , / Him selfe addrest to that aduenture hard
  • *(Francis Bacon) (1561-1626)
  • *:ripe and sad courage
  • * (1467-1533)
  • *:which treaty was wisely handled by sad and discrete counsel of both parties
  • (label) Naughty; troublesome; wicked.
  • *(Isaac Taylor) (1787–1865)
  • *:Sad tipsy fellows, both of them.
  • (label) Emotionally negative.
  • #Of colours: dark, deep; later, sombre, dull.
  • #*1646 , (Thomas Browne), Pseudodoxia Epidemica , II.5:
  • #*:this is either used crude, and called Sulphur Vive, and is of a sadder colour; or after depuration, such as we have in magdeleons of rolls, of a lighter yellow.
  • #*(Izaak Walton) (c.1594-1683)
  • #*:sad -coloured clothes
  • #* John Mortimer (1656?-1736)
  • #*:Woad, or wade, is used by the dyers to lay the foundation of all sad colours.
  • #Feeling sorrow; sorrowful, mournful.
  • #:
  • #*(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • #*:First were we sad , fearing you would not come; / Now sadder, that you come so unprovided.
  • #*(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • #*:The angelic guards ascended, mute and sad .
  • #Appearing sorrowful.
  • #:
  • #Causing sorrow; lamentable.
  • #:
  • #*
  • #*:The Great Gaels of Ireland are the men that God made mad, / For all their wars are merry and all their songs are sad .
  • #*{{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=20 citation , passage=The story struck the depressingly familiar note with which true stories ring in the tried ears of experienced policemen. No one queried it. It was in the classic pattern of human weakness, mean and embarrassing and sad .}}
  • #Poor in quality, bad; shameful, deplorable; later, regrettable, poor.
  • #:
  • #*1819 , (Lord Byron), , II.127:
  • #*:Heaven knows what cash he got, or blood he spilt, / A sad old fellow was he, if you please.
  • (label) Unfashionable; socially inadequate or undesirable.
  • :
  • (label) Soggy (to refer to pastries).
  • (label) Heavy; weighty; ponderous; close; hard.
  • :sad bread
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:his hand, more sad than lump of lead
  • * John Mortimer (1656?-1736)
  • *:Chalky lands are naturally cold and sad .
  • Synonyms

    * (feeling mentally uncomfortable) discomforted, distressed, uncomfortable, unhappy * (low in spirits) depressed, down in the dumps, glum, melancholy * poignant, touching * (causing sorrow) lamentable * (poor in quality) pitiful, sorry * See also * See also

    Antonyms

    * happy * cheerful * gleeful, upbeat * decent

    Derived terms

    * sadness

    Anagrams

    * * * 1000 English basic words ----

    baddest

    English

    Adjective

    (head)
  • (nonstandard) (bad)

  • bad

    English

    (wikipedia bad)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) bad, ).

    Adjective

  • Not good; unfavorable; negative.
  • * , chapter=10
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=He looked round the poor room, at the distempered walls, and the bad engravings in meretricious frames, the crinkly paper and wax flowers on the chiffonier; and he thought of a room like Father Bryan's, with panelling, with cut glass, with tulips in silver pots, such a room as he had hoped to have for his own.}}
  • Not suitable or fitting.
  • Seemingly non-appropriate, in manners, etc.
  • * , chapter=7
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=“[…] if you call my duds a ‘livery’ again there'll be trouble. It's bad enough to go around togged out like a life saver on a drill day, but I can stand that 'cause I'm paid for it. What I won't stand is to have them togs called a livery. […]”}}
  • Unhealthy.
  • Lard is bad'''' for you. Smoking is '''bad''' for you, too. Grapes are '''bad for dogs but not for humans.
  • Tricky; stressful; unpleasant.
  • Evil; wicked.
  • Faulty; not functional.
  • (of food) , rotten, overripe.
  • (of breath) , foul.
  • (informal) Bold and daring.
  • (of a, need or want) Severe, urgent.
  • Usage notes
    The comparative badder and superlative baddest are nonstandard.
    Synonyms
    * (not good) unfavorable, negative * * (not suitable or fitting) * * wicked, evil, vile, vicious * (not functional) faulty * (of food) rotten * (of breath) malodorous, foul * badass * (of a need or want) severe, urgent, dire (to be assigned) * false * spurious * disgusting * wrong * corrupt * ill * base * abandoned * vicious * abominable * detestable * deficient * inferior * lousy * off * poor * punk * substandard * unacceptable * ungodly * unsatisfactory * wanting * wretched * See also
    Antonyms
    * good * right * worthy * competent * benevolent * true * honest * just * sincere * beneficial * advantageous * profitable * virtuous * reputable * upright * propitious * choice * excellent * exceptional * first-class * first-rate * premium * prime * superior * adequate * sufficient
    See also
    * astray * base * bum * contemptible * defective * despicable * dirty * execrable * faulty * flawed * inadequate * insufficient * lacking * lesser * low-grade * mediocre * par * reprehensible * scurrilous * second-rate * under * unspeakable * useless * valueless * villainous * worthless
    Derived terms
    * bad actor * bad apple * bad beat * bad blood * bad boy * bad breath * bad check * bad debt * baddie * bad egg * bad ending * bad eye * bad fairy * bad faith * bad for you * bad guy * bad hair day * bad hat * bad iron * bad joke * bad language * bad light * bad lot * bad luck * bad man * bad-mannered * bad manners * bad medicine * bad money * bad-mouth * badness * bad news * bad off * bad penny * bad-tempered * Bad Thing * bad to the bone * go bad * not bad * too bad

    Adverb

  • Badly.
  • I didn't do too bad in the last exam.

    Noun

    (-)
  • (slang) error, mistake
  • Sorry, my bad !
  • * '>citation
  • *
  • *
  • (countable, uncountable, economics) An item (or kind of item) of merchandise with negative value; an unwanted good.
  • * {{quote-book, title=International Economics: Global Markets and Competition
  • , first=Henry , last=Thompson , pageurl=http://books.google.com/books?id=RQeYBbSlXLIC&lpg=PA97&dq=%22economic%20bad%22&pg=PA97
  • v=onepage&q=%22economic%20bad%22&f=false
  • , page=97 , year=2011 , edition=3rd , publisher=World Scientific , passage=Imports are an economic good but exports an economic bad . Exports must be produced but are enjoyed by foreign consumers. }}
  • * {{quote-book, title=Economics
  • , author=William J. Boyes, Michael Melvin , pageurl=http://books.google.com/books?id=LgaZaie5V1YC&lpg=PA4&dq=bads&pg=PA4
  • v=onepage&q=bads&f=false
  • , page=4 , year=2011 , edition=9th , publisher=Cengage Learning , passage=An economic bad' is anything that you would pay to get rid of. It is not so hard to think of examples of ' bads : pollution, garbage, and disease fit the description. }}

    Etymology 2

    Probably identical to bad , etymology 1, above, especially in the sense "bold, daring".

    Adjective

    (badder)
  • (rfm-sense) (slang) Fantastic.
  • You is (SIC) bad , man!
    Also Bek is "bad " at Madden.

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

    (head)
  • (archaic) .
  • Etymology 4

    Verb

    (badd)
  • (British, dialect, transitive) To shell (a walnut).
  • * 1876 , The Gloucester Journal'', Oct. 7, 1876, reported in William John Thomas, Doran (John), Henry Frederick Turle, Joseph Knight, Vernon Horace Rendall, Florence Hayllar, ''Notes and Queries , page 346
  • A curious specimen of Gloucestershire dialect c»me out in an assault case heard by the Gloucester court magistrates on Saturday. One of the witnesses, speaking of what a girl was doing at the time the assault took place, said she was ' badding' ' walnuts in a pigstye. The word is peculiarly provincial : to ' '''bad''' ' walnuts is to strip away the husk. The walnut, too, is often called » 'bannut,' and hence the old Gloucestershire phrase, ' Come an' ' bad the bannuts.'

    Statistics

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