Madded vs Badded - What's the difference?

madded | badded |


As verbs the difference between madded and badded

is that madded is (mad) while badded is (bad).

madded

English

Verb

(head)
  • (mad)

  • mad

    English

    Adjective

    (madder)
  • Insane; crazy, mentally deranged.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I have heard my grandsire say full oft, / Extremity of griefs would make men mad .
  • Angry, annoyed.
  • * , chapter=6
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=She was so mad she wouldn't speak to me for quite a spell, but at last I coaxed her into going up to Miss Emmeline's room and fetching down a tintype of the missing Deacon man.}}
  • Wildly confused or excited.
  • to be mad with terror, lust, or hatred
  • * Bible, Jer. 1. 88
  • It is the land of graven images, and they are mad upon their idols.
  • * 1787: The Fair Syrian, R. Bage, p.314
  • My brother, quiet as a cat, seems perfectly contented with the internal feelings of his felicity. The Marquis, mad as a kitten, is all in motion to express it, from tongue to heel.
  • Extremely foolish or unwise; irrational; imprudent.
  • Extremely enthusiastic about; crazy about; infatuated with; overcome with desire for.
  • (of animals) Abnormally ferocious or furious; or, rabid, affected with rabies.
  • (slang, chiefly Northeastern US) Intensifier, signifies an abundance or high quality of a thing; , much or many.
  • (of a compass needle) Having impaired polarity.
  • Usage notes

    While within the United States and Canada, the word mad'' ''does'' generally imply ''anger'' rather than insanity, such usage is still considered informal. Furthermore, if one is described as having "gone mad" or "went mad", this will unquestionably be taken as denoting ''insanity''''', and not anger. Meanwhile, if one "is mad at" something or has "been mad about" something, it will be assumed that they are '''''angered'' rather than insane. In addition, if the word is understood as being used literally, it will most likely be taken as meaning "insane". Also, in addition to the former, such derivatives as "madness", "madman", "madhouse" and "madly" ''purely denote insanity, irrespective of whether one is in the Commonwealth or in the United States. Lastly, within Commonwealth countries other than Canada, mad'' typically implies the ''insane'' or ''crazy'' sense more so than the ''angry sense.

    Synonyms

    * (insane) See also * (angry) See also * wicked, mighty, kinda, , hella.

    Adverb

    (-)
  • (slang, New England, New York, and, UK, dialect) Intensifier; to a large degree; extremely; exceedingly; very; unbelievably.
  • He was driving mad slow.
    It's mad hot today.
    He seems mad keen on her.

    Synonyms

    * hella; helluv;

    Derived terms

    * mad as a hatter * madden * madding * madhouse * madly

    Verb

    (madd)
  • To madden, to anger, to frustrate.
  • * c''. 1595 , (William Shakespeare), '' , Act V Scene 5:
  • This musick mads me, let it sound no more.
  • *, I.2.4.iv:
  • He that mads others, if he were so humoured, would be as mad himself, as much grieved and tormented […].

    badded

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (bad)

  • bad

    English

    (wikipedia bad)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) bad, ).

    Adjective

  • Not good; unfavorable; negative.
  • * , chapter=10
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=He looked round the poor room, at the distempered walls, and the bad engravings in meretricious frames, the crinkly paper and wax flowers on the chiffonier; and he thought of a room like Father Bryan's, with panelling, with cut glass, with tulips in silver pots, such a room as he had hoped to have for his own.}}
  • Not suitable or fitting.
  • Seemingly non-appropriate, in manners, etc.
  • * , chapter=7
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=“[…] if you call my duds a ‘livery’ again there'll be trouble. It's bad enough to go around togged out like a life saver on a drill day, but I can stand that 'cause I'm paid for it. What I won't stand is to have them togs called a livery. […]”}}
  • Unhealthy.
  • Lard is bad'''' for you. Smoking is '''bad''' for you, too. Grapes are '''bad for dogs but not for humans.
  • Tricky; stressful; unpleasant.
  • Evil; wicked.
  • Faulty; not functional.
  • (of food) , rotten, overripe.
  • (of breath) , foul.
  • (informal) Bold and daring.
  • (of a, need or want) Severe, urgent.
  • Usage notes
    The comparative badder and superlative baddest are nonstandard.
    Synonyms
    * (not good) unfavorable, negative * * (not suitable or fitting) * * wicked, evil, vile, vicious * (not functional) faulty * (of food) rotten * (of breath) malodorous, foul * badass * (of a need or want) severe, urgent, dire (to be assigned) * false * spurious * disgusting * wrong * corrupt * ill * base * abandoned * vicious * abominable * detestable * deficient * inferior * lousy * off * poor * punk * substandard * unacceptable * ungodly * unsatisfactory * wanting * wretched * See also
    Antonyms
    * good * right * worthy * competent * benevolent * true * honest * just * sincere * beneficial * advantageous * profitable * virtuous * reputable * upright * propitious * choice * excellent * exceptional * first-class * first-rate * premium * prime * superior * adequate * sufficient
    See also
    * astray * base * bum * contemptible * defective * despicable * dirty * execrable * faulty * flawed * inadequate * insufficient * lacking * lesser * low-grade * mediocre * par * reprehensible * scurrilous * second-rate * under * unspeakable * useless * valueless * villainous * worthless
    Derived terms
    * bad actor * bad apple * bad beat * bad blood * bad boy * bad breath * bad check * bad debt * baddie * bad egg * bad ending * bad eye * bad fairy * bad faith * bad for you * bad guy * bad hair day * bad hat * bad iron * bad joke * bad language * bad light * bad lot * bad luck * bad man * bad-mannered * bad manners * bad medicine * bad money * bad-mouth * badness * bad news * bad off * bad penny * bad-tempered * Bad Thing * bad to the bone * go bad * not bad * too bad

    Adverb

  • Badly.
  • I didn't do too bad in the last exam.

    Noun

    (-)
  • (slang) error, mistake
  • Sorry, my bad !
  • * '>citation
  • *
  • *
  • (countable, uncountable, economics) An item (or kind of item) of merchandise with negative value; an unwanted good.
  • * {{quote-book, title=International Economics: Global Markets and Competition
  • , first=Henry , last=Thompson , pageurl=http://books.google.com/books?id=RQeYBbSlXLIC&lpg=PA97&dq=%22economic%20bad%22&pg=PA97
  • v=onepage&q=%22economic%20bad%22&f=false
  • , page=97 , year=2011 , edition=3rd , publisher=World Scientific , passage=Imports are an economic good but exports an economic bad . Exports must be produced but are enjoyed by foreign consumers. }}
  • * {{quote-book, title=Economics
  • , author=William J. Boyes, Michael Melvin , pageurl=http://books.google.com/books?id=LgaZaie5V1YC&lpg=PA4&dq=bads&pg=PA4
  • v=onepage&q=bads&f=false
  • , page=4 , year=2011 , edition=9th , publisher=Cengage Learning , passage=An economic bad' is anything that you would pay to get rid of. It is not so hard to think of examples of ' bads : pollution, garbage, and disease fit the description. }}

    Etymology 2

    Probably identical to bad , etymology 1, above, especially in the sense "bold, daring".

    Adjective

    (badder)
  • (rfm-sense) (slang) Fantastic.
  • You is (SIC) bad , man!
    Also Bek is "bad " at Madden.

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

    (head)
  • (archaic) .
  • Etymology 4

    Verb

    (badd)
  • (British, dialect, transitive) To shell (a walnut).
  • * 1876 , The Gloucester Journal'', Oct. 7, 1876, reported in William John Thomas, Doran (John), Henry Frederick Turle, Joseph Knight, Vernon Horace Rendall, Florence Hayllar, ''Notes and Queries , page 346
  • A curious specimen of Gloucestershire dialect c»me out in an assault case heard by the Gloucester court magistrates on Saturday. One of the witnesses, speaking of what a girl was doing at the time the assault took place, said she was ' badding' ' walnuts in a pigstye. The word is peculiarly provincial : to ' '''bad''' ' walnuts is to strip away the husk. The walnut, too, is often called » 'bannut,' and hence the old Gloucestershire phrase, ' Come an' ' bad the bannuts.'

    Statistics

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