Shack vs Bach - What's the difference?

shack | bach | Related terms |

Shack is a related term of bach.


As a noun shack

is a crude, roughly built hut or cabin or shack can be (obsolete) grain fallen to the ground and left after harvest.

As a verb shack

is to live in or with; to shack up or shack can be (obsolete) to shed or fall, as corn or grain at harvest.

As a proper noun bach is

of english-speakers.

shack

English

(wikipedia shack)

Etymology 1

Some authorities derive this word from (etyl)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A crude, roughly built hut or cabin.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1913, author=
  • , title=Lord Stranleigh Abroad , chapter=6 citation , passage=The men resided in a huge bunk house, which consisted of one room only, with a shack outside where the cooking was done. In the large room were a dozen bunks?; half of them in a very dishevelled state, […]}}
  • Any unpleasant, poorly constructed or poorly furnished building.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To live in or with; to shack up.
  • Etymology 2

    Obsolete variant of shake. Compare (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • (obsolete) Grain fallen to the ground and left after harvest.
  • (obsolete) Nuts which have fallen to the ground.
  • (obsolete) Freedom to pasturage in order to feed upon shack .
  • * 1918, Christobel Mary Hoare Hood, The History of an East Anglian Soke [http://books.google.com/books?ie=UTF-8&hl=en&vid=OCLC11859773&id=rI0iE-yqyAMC&q=%22right+to+shack%22&prev=http://books.google.com/books%3Flr%3D%26q%3D%2522right%2Bto%2Bshack%2522&pgis=1]
  • [...] first comes the case of tenants with a customary right to shack their sheep and cattle who have overburdened the fields with a larger number of beasts than their tenement entitles them to, or who have allowed their beasts to feed in the field out of shack time.
  • * 1996, J M Neeson, Commoners [http://books.google.com/books?ie=UTF-8&hl=en&vid=ISBN0521567742&id=2CqhjjiwLtEC&pg=PA76&lpg=PA76&sig=3geUREguU3vTYj_05PtAfzFODDA]
  • The fields were enclosed by Act in 1791, and Tharp gave the cottagers about thirteen acres for their right of shack .
  • (UK, US, dialect, obsolete) A shiftless fellow; a low, itinerant beggar; a vagabond; a tramp.
  • (Forby)
  • * Henry Ward Beecher
  • All the poor old shacks about the town found a friend in Deacon Marble.
    Derived terms
    * common of shack

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To shed or fall, as corn or grain at harvest.
  • (obsolete) To feed in stubble, or upon waste.
  • (Grose)
  • * 1918, Christobel Mary Hoare Hood, The History of an East Anglian Soke [http://books.google.com/books?ie=UTF-8&hl=en&vid=OCLC11859773&id=rI0iE-yqyAMC&q=%22right+to+shack%22&prev=http://books.google.com/books%3Flr%3D%26q%3D%2522right%2Bto%2Bshack%2522&pgis=1]
  • first comes the case of tenants with a customary right to shack their sheep and cattle who have overburdened the fields with a larger number of beasts than their tenement entitles them to, or who have allowed their beasts to feed in the field out of shack time.
  • (UK, dialect) To wander as a vagabond or tramp.
  • Anagrams

    *

    References

    bach

    English

    Noun

    (baches)
  • (New Zealand, northern) A holiday home, usually small and near the beach, often with only one or two rooms and of simple construction.
  • Synonyms

    * crib (New Zealand)

    Verb

    (es)
  • (US) To live apart from women, as with the period when a divorce is in progress (compare bachelor pad).
  • Anagrams

    * ----